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by Ruth Barton

Author: Ruth Barton
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge (June 17, 2004)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: txt mbr doc lrf

Ruth Barton demonstrates an utter mastery of the Irish film field.

Ruth Barton demonstrates an utter mastery of the Irish film field. Series: National Cinemas.

An invaluable resource for students of world cinema.

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Publication year: 2004. Contributors: Ruth Barton.

In a series of chapters on contemporary Irish filmmaking, this book further reflects on questions of nationalism, gender identities, the representation of the Troubles and of Irish history as well as cinema's response to the so-called Celtic Tiger and its aftermath. Publication year: 2004. Subjects: Motion tory.

National cinema is a term sometimes used in film theory and film criticism to describe the films associated with a specific nation-state. Although there is little relatively written on theories of national cinema it has an irrefutably important role. Although there is little relatively written on theories of national cinema it has an irrefutably important role in globalization. Film provides a unique window to other cultures, particularly where the output of a nation or region is high. Countries like South Korea, Russia and Iran have over the years produced a large body of critically acclaimed films.

ISBN13:9780415278942.

Irish national cinema. Article · January 2004 with 40 Reads. Ruth Barton This innovative book presents for the first time detailed histories of the impact of the Great War on British cinema in the silent period, from actual. DOI: 1. 324/9780203642344. Cite this publication. Trinity College Dublin. Writing in 2004 on Irish cinema, I identified a trend that had emerged in the previous decade of films defined by nostalgia for a pre-modern Ireland. This innovative book presents for the first time detailed histories of the impact of the Great War on British cinema in the silent period, from actual war footage to fiction filmmaking. In doing so it explores how cinema helped to shape the public memory of the war during the 1920s.

From the international successes of Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan, to the smaller productions of the new generation of Irish filmmakers, this book explores questions of nationalism, gender identities, the representation of the Troubles and of Irish history as well as cinema's response to the so-called Celtic Tiger and its aftermath.

Irish National Cinema argues that in order to understand the unique position of filmmaking in Ireland and the inheritance on which contemporary filmmakers draw, definitions of the Irish culture and identity must take into account the so-called Irish diaspora and engage with its cinema.

An invaluable resource for students of world cinema.