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by David Wagner

Author: David Wagner
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (January 17, 2005)
Pages: 200 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf lit mobi

For a small volume, David Wagner's The Poorhouse: Ameica's Forgotten Institution has a hefty agenda. The Poorhouse turns out to be a most appealing and timely book with much to say about contemporary socail policy.

For a small volume, David Wagner's The Poorhouse: Ameica's Forgotten Institution has a hefty agenda. Over seven short chapters, Wagner sketches the story of the fabeled symbol of vulnerability and failure that for generations accumulated America's infirm, superannuated, and dipossessed while birthing specialized institutions for child wellfare, substance abuse treatment, and psychiatric, medical, and geriatric care.

Surprisingly these institutions variously named poorhouses, poor farms, sometimes almshouses or. .David Wagner is professor of social work and sociology at the University of Southern Maine.

Surprisingly these institutions variously named poorhouses, poor farms, sometimes almshouses or workhouses, have received rather scant academic treatment, as well, though tens of millions of poor people were confined there, while often their neighbors talked in hushed tones and in fear of their own fate at the 'specter of the poorhouse. He is the author of five books, including Checkerboard Square: Culture and Resistance in a Homeless Community, winner of the 1993 C. Wright Mills Book Award.

Often the poorhouse was situated on the grounds of a poor farm on which able-bodied residents were required to work. The poorhouse : America's forgotten institution David Wagner. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2005. Such farms were common in the United States in the 19th and early 20th centuries. A poorhouse could even be part of the same economic complex as a prison farm and other penal or charitable public institutions. Poor farms were county- or town-run residences where paupers (mainly elderly and disabled people) were supported at public expense.

Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. 6. 0 hardcover, $ 2. 5 papercover. cgi?article 3189&context jssw. The Poorhouse: America's Forgotten Institution. The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 2006

Venereal disease was omnipresent in America’s major port city, and diseased residents were surrounded by a thriving medical marketplace.

Venereal disease was omnipresent in America’s major port city, and diseased residents were surrounded by a thriving medical marketplace. Historians have identified the who and why of prostitution, however the scope of the prostitute experience has yet to be fully explored. This dissertation will address a considerable and important gap in the historiography of prostitutes’ lives as it actually affected women.

Keywords: Poorhouse, David Wagner, America's Forgotten Institution.

David Wagner challenges this common understanding in The Poorhouse:America's. After an introductory chapter which clarifies terms and places the poorhouse into the context of the historiogra-phy of .

The Poorhouse: America’s Forgotten Institution. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

Many of us grew up hearing our parents exclaim 'you are driving me to the poorhouse!' or remember the card in the 'Monopoly' game which says 'Go to the Poorhouse! Lose a Turn!' Yet most Americans know little or nothing of this institution that existed under a variety of names for approximately three hundred years of American history. Surprisingly these institutions variously named poorhouses, poor farms, sometimes almshouses or workhouses, have received rather scant academic treatment, as well, though tens of millions of poor people were confined there, while often their neighbors talked in hushed tones and in fear of their own fate at the 'specter of the poorhouse.' Based on the author's study of six New England poorhouses/poor farms, a hidden story in America's history is presented which will be of popular interest as well as useful as a text in social welfare and social history. While the poorhouse's mission was character reform and 'repressing pauperism,' these goals were gradually undermined by poor people themselves, who often learned to use the poorhouse for their own benefit, as well as by staff and officials of the houses, who had agendas sometimes at odds with the purposes for which the poorhouse was invented.