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Download The Midwife of Platonism: Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus djvu

Download The Midwife of Platonism: Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus djvu

by David Sedley

Author: David Sedley
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Clarendon Press (October 5, 2006)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt rtf lrf azw

The Midwife of Platonism by David Sedley is an enjoyable book to read. I chose this text because it appeared to be the best current treatment of the Theaetetus, an important inspiration for Plotinus and later Neoplatonism.

The Midwife of Platonism by David Sedley is an enjoyable book to read. I reccommend to anyone with an interest in the Theaetetus and in the perennial question of Socrates. David Sedley is Laurence Professor of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge.

Plato's Theaetetus is an acknowledged masterpiece, and among the most influential texts in the history of epistemology. Since antiquity it has been debated whether this dialogue was written by Plato to support his familiar metaphysical doctrines, or represents a self-distancing from these. David Sedley's book offers a via media, founded on a radical separation of the author, Plato, from his main speaker, Socrates

Sedley's book attempts to address these issues providing, along the way, a thoroughly .

Sedley's book attempts to address these issues providing, along the way, a thoroughly stimulating and compelling interpretation of the dialogue. The overarching aim of his study is to offer a historical lens through which to read Theaetetus. Sedley argues that Socrates, the semi-historical figure portrayed in Plato's early dialogues, functions here as the midwife of Platonism: true to his philosophically negative mission in the "early" dialogues, he presses the right questions, forces his interlocutors to admit ignorance, but stops short of reaching a conclusive definition.

Plato’s Theaetetus is thought to have been written after his main middle-period dialogues, in which he expounded his celebrated . The message is that Socrates, although not himself a Platonist, was the midwife of Platonism.

Plato’s Theaetetus is thought to have been written after his main middle-period dialogues, in which he expounded his celebrated metaphysical doctrine of Forms. Yet, it is an open-ended Socratic dialogue and investigates the question ‘What is knowledge?’ without positive result, and with an unexpected restraint about invoking the metaphysical theory. Why? This book develops a new solution to the old question. This is brought out by portraying a Socrates who, rather than Plato’s current spokesman, is a throwback to the semi-historical figure immortalized in the early dialogues.

The Midwife of Platonism book. The Theaetetus is among the most brilliant of Plato's dialogues, but is also deeply enigmatic, leaving readers divided over its philosophical intentions

The Midwife of Platonism book. The Theaetetus is among the most brilliant of Plato's dialogues, but is also deeply enigmatic, leaving readers divided over its philosophical intentions. David Sedley proposes and develops a solution, based on a groundbreaking two-level reading.

This listing is for The Midwife of Platonism : Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus by David Sedley (2004, Hardcover) : David Sedley (2004) ISBN 9780199267033: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition. For US customer standard shipping is Media mail typically which takes 5-9 business days. It is elegant and engaging, a refreshing reconsideration of the relation of Plato to Socrates. Sedley defends the following provocative thesis: In the Theaetetus Plato pays homage by showing how much Socrates accomplished relying on the substantive principles implicit in his maieutic expertise, a chief accomplishment being aiding in the birth of the Platonic theories found in the Republic and Phaedo.

The Theaetetus is among the most brilliant of Plato's dialogues, but is also deeply enigmatic, leaving readers divided over its philosophical intentions. David Sedley proposes and develops a solution, based on a groundbreaking two-level reading. Offering significant reinterpretations of the dialogue's main arguments, The Midwife of Platonism is addressed to all readers interested in Plato, and does not require knowledge of Greek.