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by Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom,Lynn Hunt,Marilyn B. Young,Florence Bernault,Robin Blackburn,Alice Bullard,Carlos Basombrío Iglesias,Yanni Kotsonis,Timothy McDaniel,Adam Michnik,David Rieff,Alexander Woodside,Marilyn Young,David Zaret,Michael Zuckert

Author: Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom,Lynn Hunt,Marilyn B. Young,Florence Bernault,Robin Blackburn,Alice Bullard,Carlos Basombrío Iglesias,Yanni Kotsonis,Timothy McDaniel,Adam Michnik,David Rieff,Alexander Woodside,Marilyn Young,David Zaret,Michael Zuckert
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (August 2000)
Pages: 272 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr lrf txt doc

With human rights now at the top of the international agenda, we must consider whether the concept is universal or bound by history and culture.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. With human rights now at the top of the international agenda, we must consider whether the concept is universal or bound by history and culture with different meanings around the world.

Human Rights and Revolutions book.

Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Lynn Hunt, Marilyn B. Young, Florence Bernault, Robin Blackburn, Alice Bullard, Carlos Basombrío Iglesias, Yanni Kotsonis, Timothy McDaniel, Adam Michnik, David Rieff, Alexander Woodside, Marilyn Young, David Zaret, Michael Zuckert. This original and important book examines the paradoxical yet fundamental relationship between revolutions and the discourse of human rights as it has developed over the last four centuries

Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom is Associate Professor of History at Indiana University, Bloomington. Marilyn B. Young is a professor of history at New York University. She lives in New York City.

Contributions by: Florence Bernault, Mark Philip Bradley, Sumit Ganguly, Greg Grandin, James N. Green, Lynn Hunt, Yanni Kotsonis, Timothy McDaniel, Kristin Ross, Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Alexander Woodside, Marilyn B. Young, David Zaret, and Michael Zuckert. Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom is professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. Greg Grandin is professor of history at New York University. Lynn Hunt is Eugen Weber Professor of French History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Young, ed. Young, eds. Human Rights and Revolutions. Human rights-inalienable rights belonging equally and by nature to all human beings-emerged during the French and American Revolutions based on Enlightenment ideas, legal traditions, and the innovations of the English Civil War and the Revolution of 1688. This in itself justifies the comparative study of the relationship between revolutions and human rights, a case further strengthened by the crucial differences between these revolutions

Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Greg Grandin, Lynn Hunt.

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Human Rights and Revolutions.

Preface Marilyn B. Young. Part I: Introductory Perspectives. 6 A European Experience: Human Rights and Citizenship in Revolutionary Russia Yanni Kotsonis. vii 3 19. 43 59. 79 99. vi Contents. 1 The Paradoxical Origins of Human Rights Lynn Hunt. 2 The Chinese Revolution and Contemporary Paradoxes Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom. Part II: Anglo-American Events and Traditions. 3 Tradition, Human Rights, and the English Revolution David Zaret. 4 Natural Rights in the American Revolution: The American Amalgam Michael Zuckert.

This original and important book examines the paradoxical yet fundamental relationship between revolutions and the discourse of human rights as it has developed over the last four centuries. In a multidisciplinary collection of essays, activists and scholars compare times and places as remote from each other as seventeenth-century England and contemporary Kosovo, bringing to bear ideas and methodologies associated with disciplines ranging from cultural history to political philosophy. In doing so, they seek to shed light on a crucial conundrum: on the one hand, revolutionary regimes often have been responsible for horrific human rights abuses, and yet on the other, revolutionary struggles often serve as a crucible to elevate appreciation for the importance of human rights.This work will be invaluable for anyone seeking a nuanced understanding of what it means to be human and those rights to which we should be able to lay claim as a result.