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by Jane Marie Todd,Catherine Chalier

Author: Jane Marie Todd,Catherine Chalier
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (April 19, 2002)
Pages: 208 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.8
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If you have wondered whether Levinas is a Kantian, you will find Chalier's knowledgeable book helpful for reflection .

If you have wondered whether Levinas is a Kantian, you will find Chalier's knowledgeable book helpful for reflection on the question. Whereas most introductions to Levinas's thought take the reader by way of the history of twentieth century European philosophy, Catherine Chalier here succeeds in laying out Levinas's ethical philosophy by reference to Kant.

Chalier analyzes the positions of two great moral philosophers, Kant and Levinas Although based on a close and elegant presentation of Kant and Levinas, Chalier's book serves as a context for the development of the author's own reflections on the question.

Chalier analyzes the positions of two great moral philosophers, Kant and Levinas. While both are critical of an ethics founded on knowledge, their criticisms spring from distinctly different points of view. Chalier reexamines their conclusions, pitting Levinas against (and with) Kant, to interrogate the very foundations of moral philosophy and moral imperatives. Although based on a close and elegant presentation of Kant and Levinas, Chalier's book serves as a context for the development of the author's own reflections on the question "What am I supposed to do?" and its continued importance for contemporary philosophy.

Morality in Kant and Levinas. by Catherine Chalier. Is it possible to apply a theoretical approach to ethics? The French philosopher Catherine Chalier addresses this question with an unusual combination of traditional ethics and continental philosophy. In a powerful argument for the necessity of moral reflection, Chalier counters the notion that morality can be derived from theoretical knowledge. Chalier analyzes the positions of two great moral philosophers, Kant and Levinas.

Catherine Chalier is known for several fine books that demonstrate her familiarity with the philosophy of. .1785), while Levinas never deals with applied ethics, and (2) the role history plays in Kant’s and Levinas’s more or less hopeful perspectives on the reality of moral life.

Catherine Chalier is known for several fine books that demonstrate her familiarity with the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas or develop his thought in relation to urgent questions of our time.

Both Kant and Levinas state that traditional ontology is a type of philosophy that illegitimately forces the structure of human reason onto other beings, thus making the subject the center and origin of all meaning.

Cornell University Press (2002). Both Kant and Levinas state that traditional ontology is a type of philosophy that illegitimately forces the structure of human reason onto other beings, thus making the subject the center and origin of all meaning. Kant’s critique of the ontology of his scholastic predecessors is well known. For Levinas, however, it does not suffice. He rejects what we could call an ‘existential ontology’: a self-centered way of living as a whole, of which all philosophical ontology is but a branch ) he presents an ethical way of living centered on ‘the Other’.

What ought I to do?: morality in Kant and Levinas. Kant and the reach of reason: studies in Kant's theory of rational systematization. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. Cohen, Ted and Paul Guyer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Kant's theory of knowledge and reality: a group of essays.

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Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. What ought I to do : morality in Kant and Levinas Catherine Chalier ; translated from the French by Jane Marie Todd. Book's title: What ought I to do : morality in Kant and Levinas Catherine Chalier ; translated from the French by Jane Marie Todd. Library of Congress Control Number: 2001006789. National Bibliography Number: GBA2-X9104. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0801437091 (alk. paper).

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Kant’s and Levinas’s reprobation of knowledge, which is powerless to make people better . Neither Kant nor Levinas believes that the good’s anteriority in relation to evil implies that men spontaneously tend toward morality

Kant’s and Levinas’s reprobation of knowledge, which is powerless to make people better, does not lead to any attempt to substitute a praise of feelings as the vector of morality. Both, in fact, are reluctant to trust efforts to defend man’s spontaneous compassion or sympathy toward others. Nothing is less sure, they say, and no ethics can rely on the partiality of individual impulses, even generous ones, without running the risk of injustice. Neither Kant nor Levinas believes that the good’s anteriority in relation to evil implies that men spontaneously tend toward morality. As a result, both philosophers reflect on the conditions for the efficacy of the good.

David John Birnie (16 February 1951 – 7 October 2005) and Catherine Margaret Birnie (nee Harrison) (born 23 May 1951) were an Australian couple from Perth, Western Australia. They murdered four women ranging in age from 15 to 31 at their home in 1986, and attempted to murder a fifth. These crimes were referred to in the press as the Moorhouse murders, after the Birnies' address at 3 Moorhouse Street in Willagee, a suburb of Perth.

Is it possible to apply a theoretical approach to ethics? The French philosopher Catherine Chalier addresses this question with an unusual combination of traditional ethics and continental philosophy. In a powerful argument for the necessity of moral reflection, Chalier counters the notion that morality can be derived from theoretical knowledge. Chalier analyzes the positions of two great moral philosophers, Kant and Levinas. While both are critical of an ethics founded on knowledge, their criticisms spring from distinctly different points of view. Chalier reexamines their conclusions, pitting Levinas against (and with) Kant, to interrogate the very foundations of moral philosophy and moral imperatives. She provides a clear, systematic comparison of their positions on essential ideas such as free will, happiness, freedom, and evil. Although based on a close and elegant presentation of Kant and Levinas, Chalier's book serves as a context for the development of the author's own reflections on the question "What am I supposed to do?" and its continued importance for contemporary philosophy.