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by Matthew C. Bagger

Author: Matthew C. Bagger
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (November 13, 1999)
Pages: 238 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr docx lrf lrf

Some have appealed to extraordinary religious experience in making their case. Religious Experience, Justification, and History restores neglected explanatory and historical considerations to the debate.

Some have appealed to extraordinary religious experience in making their case. Through reflection on the history of philosophy, it also unravels the philosophical use of the term justification.

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Home Browse Books Book details, Religious Experience, Justification, and History. Religious Experience, Justification, and History. By Matthew C. Bagger. Matthew Bagger argues that the commitment to supernatural explanations implicit in the religious experiences employed to justify religious belief contradicts the modern ideal of human flourishing. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

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Many philosophers of religion have sought to defend the rationality of religious belief by shifting the burden of proof onto the critic of religious belief. Some have appealed to extraordinary religious experience in making their case. Religious Experience, Justification and History restores neglected explanatory and historical considerations to the debate.

Thomas A. Forsthoefel.

Religious Experience, Justification, and History. Thomas A.

Matthew C. Bagger Religious Experience, Justification, and History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999). Pp. ix + 238. £3. 0 (Hbk).

Some argue that religious experiences are unlike ordinary perception, and so do not justify . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Some argue that religious experiences are unlike ordinary perception, and so do not justify the corresponding. Part of the SpringerBriefs in Religious Studies book series (BRIEFSRESTU, volume 2). Abstract. Under ordinary circumstances, perceptual experience provides good grounds for belief. Some argue that religious experiences are unlike ordinary perception, and so do not justify the corresponding beliefs. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Balcetis, Emily, and D. Dunning.

B24 Title: Religious experience, justification, and history, Matthew C. Personal Author: Bagger, Matthew C. Publication info: Cambridge, . New York : Cambridge University Press, c1999. B333 Title: Atheism : a very short introduction, Julian Baggini. Personal Author: Baggini, Julian.

Religious Experience, Justification, and History . Matthew C. Bagger is now Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Brown University, teaching in philosophy of religion, theory and method in the study of religion, Christian ethical theories, and modern Western religious thought. This is his first book (of two to date), written while he was Assistant Professor in the Religion Department of Columbia University.

Recently, many philosophers of religion have sought to defend the rationality of religious belief by shifting the burden of proof onto the critic of religious belief. Some have appealed to extraordinary religious experience in making their case. Religious Experience, Justification, and History restores neglected explanatory and historical considerations to the debate. Through a study of William James, it contests the accounts of religious experience offered in recent works. Through reflection on the history of philosophy, it also unravels the philosophical use of the term justification. Matthew Bagger argues that the commitment to supernatural explanations implicit in the religious experiences employed to justify religious belief contradicts the modern ideal of human flourishing.