» » The Problem of Perception
Download The Problem of Perception djvu

Download The Problem of Perception djvu

by A. D. Smith

Author: A. D. Smith
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1st edition (June 15, 2002)
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf lit mobi mbr

The Problem of Perception book.

The Problem of Perception book. In a major contribution to the theory of perception, A. D. Smith presents a truly original defense of direct realism-the view that in perception we are directly aware of things in the physical world.

Sense-perception has long been a preoccupation of philosophers

Sense-perception has long been a preoccupation of philosophers. One pervasive and traditional problem, sometimes called the Problem of Perception, is created by the phenomena of perceptual illusion and hallucination: if these kinds of error are possible, how can perception be what we ordinarily understand it to be, an openness to and awareness of the world? The present entry is about how these possibilities of error challenge the intelligibility of the phenomenon of perception, and how the major theories of experience in the last century are best understood as responses to this challenge.

Smith's The Problem of Perception is an indirect defense of direct realism (also known as naïve realism). In this book A. Smith offers an original defence of Direct Realism against the challenges offered by the Argument from Illusion and the Argument from Hallucination. One of the interesting and unusual features of Smith's position is that he regards both direct realism and idealism as more plausible than representational or indirect realism.

Behavior here refers to observable actions, while mind subsumes perception, memory, motivation, emotion, and so forth. Among German-speakers, psychology is often defined as the. science of Erleben (experience) and Verhalten (behavior), which accords well with the American definitions.

Similar books and articles. The Problem of Perception. A. Smith - 2002 - Harvard University Press. Fiona Macpherson - 2004 - Philosophical Books 45 (3):255-257

Similar books and articles. Tim Crane - 2005 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Determining the Primary Problem of Visual Perception: A Gibsonian Response to the Correlation' Objection. Philip A. Glotzbach - 1992 - Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):69-94. Fiona Macpherson - 2004 - Philosophical Books 45 (3):255-257. The Neurological Approach to the Problem of Perception. W. Russell Brain - 1946 - Philosophy 21 (July):133-146. Merleau-Ponty and the Transcendental Problem of Bodily Agency.

Adam Smith and the Problem of the External World’, Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9(2): 205–23. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Glenney, Brian (2013). Philosophical problems, cluster concepts, and the many lives of Molyneux’s question’, Biology and Philosophy 28 3: 541–58. Glenney, Brian (2014). Gordon, Robert (1995). Sympathy, Simulation, and the Impartial Spectator’, Ethics 105(4): 727–42. Griswold, Charles L. (1999).

In a major contribution to the theory of perception, A. Smith presents a truly original defense of direct realism - the view that in perception we are directly aware of things in the . 5. The Nature of Perceptual Consciousness. II. The Argument from Hallucination

In a major contribution to the theory of perception, A. Smith presents a truly original defense of direct realism - the view that in perception we are directly aware of things in the physical world. The Argument from Hallucination. 8. An Extreme Proposal.

The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of explaining why and how sentient organisms have qualia or phenomenal experiences-how and why it is that some internal states are felt states, such as heat or pain, rather than unfelt states, as in . .

The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of explaining why and how sentient organisms have qualia or phenomenal experiences-how and why it is that some internal states are felt states, such as heat or pain, rather than unfelt states, as in a thermostat or a toaster.

In a major contribution to the theory of perception, A. D. Smith presents a truly original defense of direct realism--the view that in perception we are directly aware of things in the physical world.

The Problem of Perception offers two arguments against direct realism--one concerning illusion, and one concerning hallucination--that no current theory of perception can adequately rebut. Smith then develops a theory of perception that does succeed in answering these arguments; and because these arguments are the only two that present direct realism with serious problems arising from the nature of perception, direct realism emerges here for the first time as an ultimately tenable position within the philosophy of perception.

At the heart of Smith's theory is a new way of drawing the distinction between perception and sensation, along with an unusual treatment of the nature of objects of hallucination. With in-depth reference to both the analytical and the phenomenological literature on perception, and with telling criticism of alternative views, Smith's groundbreaking work will be of value to philosophers of perception in both the analytical and the phenomenological tradition, as well as to psychologists of perception.