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Download Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) djvu

Download Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) djvu

by P. W. Singer

Author: P. W. Singer
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press (May 20, 2003)
Pages: 352 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit doc lrf txt

Singer's Corporate Warriors is an excellent book about the world of private military firms (also called private military security contractors). When he wrote this, the United States was not yet involved in Iraq, let alone against ISIS.

Singer's Corporate Warriors is an excellent book about the world of private military firms (also called private military security contractors). It was updated in 2008 as Barack Obama was running for president so it has been somewhat updated though not completely.

This new "Privatized Military Industry" encompasses hundreds of companies, thousands of employees, and billions .

This new "Privatized Military Industry" encompasses hundreds of companies, thousands of employees, and billions of dollars in revenue. Whether as proxies or suppliers, such firms have participated in wars in Africa, Asia, the Balkans, and Latin America.

Corporate Warriors book . He seems to always be one of the first to really study in a comprehensive and coherent manner certain evolutionary changes in the way war is fought, and Corporate Warriors is no exception. His other works deal with heady subjects like robotics in war and child soldiers, and here he is at the forefront of yet another startling trend.

Peter Singer has produced a highly commendable volume for the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs series on an area of study that has received relatively little attention within the academic world. Much of the existing literature focuses on the mercenary end of private military companies (PMCs) and ignores the breadth of the industry

To date, most discussion of security privatization in international politics has been focused on the role of private military companies and mercenaries. Much of the existing literature focuses on the mercenary end of private military companies (PMCs) and ignores the breadth of the industry. To date, most discussion of security privatization in international politics has been focused on the role of private military companies and mercenaries. This article seeks to shift the focus away from the battlefields and toward the less spectacular privatization and globalization of commercial private security.

This material in this section greatly supports the author’s earlier claim that today’s PMFs have no historical precedent.

This new "Privatized Military Industry" encompasses hundreds of. .Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Corporate Warriors includes a description of how the business works, as well as portraits of each of the basic types of companies: military providers that offer troops for tactical operations; military consultants that supply expert advice and training; and military support companies that sell logistics, intelligence, and engineering.

Some have claimed that'War is too important to be left to the generals,'but P. W. Singer asks'What about the business executives?'Breaking out of the guns-for-hire mold of traditional mercenaries, corporations now sell skills and services that until recently only state militaries possessed. Their products range from trained commando teams to strategic advice from generals.

This new'Privatized Military Industry'encompasses hundreds of companies, thousands of employees, and billions of dollars in revenue. Whether as proxies or suppliers, such firms have participated in wars in Africa, Asia, the Balkans, and Latin America. More recently, they have become a key element in U.S. military operations. Private corporations working for profit now sway the course of national and international conflict, but the consequences have been little explored.

In this book, Singer provides the first account of the military services industry and its broader implications. Corporate Warriors includes a description of how the business works, as well as portraits of each of the basic types of companies: military providers that offer troops for tactical operations; military consultants that supply expert advice and training; and military support companies that sell logistics, intelligence, and engineering.

The privatization of warfare allows startling new capabilities and efficiencies in the ways that war is carried out. At the same time, however, Singer finds that the entrance of the profit motive onto the battlefield raises a series of troubling questions'for democracy, for ethics, for management, for human rights, and for national security.