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Download Little Learning Is a Dangerous Thing: 600 Wise and Witty Observations for Students, Teachers and Other Survivors of Higher Education djvu

Download Little Learning Is a Dangerous Thing: 600 Wise and Witty Observations for Students, Teachers and Other Survivors of Higher Education djvu

by James Charlton

Author: James Charlton
Subcategory: Education
Language: English
Publisher: Diane Pub Co (June 1, 1994)
Category: Other
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi docx mbr txt

Here's an enjoyable little book of brief quotations with attributions but not citations. The theme, in keeping with its title, is learning and the learning environment.

Here's an enjoyable little book of brief quotations with attributions but not citations. Caveat: it's for a popular audience so some of the attributions reflect folk knowledge instead of scholarship. The quotation about university politics being attributed yet again.

The subtitle (in appropriate, concise British fashion) is "600 Wise and Witty Observations for Students, Teachers and Other Survivors of Higher Education. Published by Robert Hale in London, 1994. Some are sage; some are cynical; some bemuse; some baffle.

book by James Charlton.

600 Wise and Witty Observations for Students, Teachers and Other Survivors of Higher Education. Published November 30, 1994 by Robert Hale Ltd.

A little learning is worse than vast learning. However, in others, this qualification may simply seem to be a little learning. A little learning is even worse than ignorance. The harm done to society by men of a little learning is incalculable. It is often seen that a person with little learning tries to show that he knows more that he actually does. In trying to prove his wisdom, he may do such acts that may put him to danger. Nature of men with little learning: A quack, for example, may pass for a very good doctor among illiterate people. He carries on with his practice doing the greatest possible harm to people who need good medical treatment.

A blog for teachers and students to get any type of resources, tips, information, guides, notes, teaching materials. But the power lies in complete knowledge and practice. A little knowledge is rather a dangerous thing. This story will prove that. On a hot summer noon, some camel men stayed beneath a bunch of tree for some rest. They set their camel to graze. One of the camels entered the melon field and stated eating melons. By chance, a melon got jammed in the camel’s throat. The animal began to make noise. When the owner of the camel saw it, he understood the matter at once. He got a blanket and wrapped it on the neck of the camel and hit it hard with a wooden mallet.

A little learning is a dangerous thing. Most people have heard the old line of poetry: A little learning is a dangerous thing

A little learning is a dangerous thing. A little knowledge, too, but that’s a misquote. Most people have heard the old line of poetry: A little learning is a dangerous thing. It became a proverbial saying that has been - and is still is - used and repurposed in many ways. The common variation is A little knowledge is a dangerous thing blah-BLAH, blah-BLAH.

A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing when dealing with the intricate art of hair cutting. The earliest literary use of the phrase is seen in 1601's 'The Essay: Of Atheism' by Francis Bacon. Then it was used again in 1698 by an anonymous writer in 'The mystery of phanaticism'. The phrase may have been in use prior to this also. a little learning can be a dangerous thing.

A little learning is a dangerous thing ; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring : There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain . If a person with limited education enters the world of business, he faces hurdles and outright losses

A little learning is a dangerous thing ; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring : There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, And drinking largely sobers us again If a person with limited education enters the world of business, he faces hurdles and outright losses. Therefore, Dale Neef has aptly used this proverb in the title of the book.