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Download Prophecy and Progress: The Sociology of Industrial and Pre-Industrial Society (Pelican) djvu

by Krishan Kumar

Author: Krishan Kumar
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (October 26, 1978)
Pages: 416 pages
Category: No category
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw lrf lit docx

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Prophecy and Progress book.

Facing the Future: Mastering the Probable and Managing the Unpredictable. Arthur L. Stinchcombe.

May 1979, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 494–495 Cite as. Prophecy and Progress. Authors and affiliations. First Online: 01 May 1979.

Prophecy and progress by Kumar, Krishan.

Krishan Kumar (born 1942 in Trinidad and Tobago) is a British sociologist who is currently Chair of the Department of. .

Krishan Kumar (born 1942 in Trinidad and Tobago) is a British sociologist who is currently Chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia, where he holds the titles University Professor and William R. Kenan, J. Professor of Sociology.

Krishan Kumar is an Indian sociologist who is currently Chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia, where he holds the titles University Professor and William R. Kenan, Junior.

In recent years a chorus of futurologists has sprung up, some pessimistic, some not. However all are concerned with the future of the industrial society. This book takes a close look at industrial society, past and present, in order to evaluate these miltifarious claims. The author begins with the industrial revolution itself, examining the ideas it inspired, especially the idea of progress and the balance of confidence and despair about industrialism. Moving on to the post-industrial idea, Dr Kumar arrives at the conclusion that much of it is plausable only because of a widespread misconception of what "classic" industrial society was all about. He concludes with a discussion of whether we can expect a future society that geninuely goes "beyond industrialism".