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Download Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines : An Illustrated History of South Jersey's Jointly-Owned Railroad djvu

Download Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines : An Illustrated History of South Jersey's Jointly-Owned Railroad djvu

by Frederick A Kramer

Author: Frederick A Kramer
Language: English
Publisher: Crusader Press; 1980 edition edition (1980)
Pages: 104 pages
Category: No category
Rating: 4.7
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The Seashore Lines was a railroad that operated in southern New Jersey in the 20th century. It was created in 1933 as a joint consolidation venture between two competing railroads in the region.

The Seashore Lines was a railroad that operated in southern New Jersey in the 20th century. In the early 20th century Atlantic City and the South Jersey seashore were major seaside vacation destinations for the Philadelphia area's wealthy and working class populations

Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines book.

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Fascinating history of the how the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Reading Railroad, after years of determined competition, merged their New Jersey lines to create the Seashore Lines. The railroads to the shore were once called the spine of the beaches, serving the summer visitors and freight needs of the area for decades. The author covers the rivalry, including the dueling ferry services across the Delaware River, and then follows the merger through the good years and the bad, ending with the takeover by Conrail in 1976

The Seashore Lines was a jointly-owned operation of the Pennsylvania and Reading railroads.

The Seashore Lines was a jointly-owned operation of the Pennsylvania and Reading railroads. The PRSL served the popular tourism and beach destinations west and south of Philadelphia along the New Jersey coast reaching such seaside towns as Atlantic City, Ocean City, and Cape May. For many years the two railroads had, via their predecessor lines, competed fiercely for the lucrative passenger traffic of vacationers flocking to these popular beach destinations. During the line's peak years it was double-tracked in some locations, electrified in others, operated hundreds.

Seashore Lines: an illustrated history of South Jersey's jointly-owned railroad. a b c The Reading seashore lines : a pictorial documentary of the Atlantic City Railroad. Ambler, P. Crusader Press. Palmyra, NJ: West Jersey Chapter, National Railway Historical Society.

Find nearly any book by Frederick A Kramer. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Frederick A Kramer. ISBN 9781882727155 (978-1-882727-15-5) Softcover, Bells & Whistles, 1996.

1 West Jersey & Seashore Railroad. Atlantic City Railroad. Beginning in the 1950s the PRSL purchased a rather modest fleet of its own diesel locomotives to replace its steam engines for passenger and freight services. When additional power was needed for the busy summer tourist season engines were borrowed from the parent corporations (usually the PRR) as was true previously the with steam locomotives.

Seashore Lines The Seashore Lines was the jointly owned June 25, 1933, consolidation of Pennsylvania Railroad's West Jersey & Seashore, which dated from 1896, and Reading Company's Atlantic City Railroad, an 1883.

Seashore Lines The Seashore Lines was the jointly owned June 25, 1933, consolidation of Pennsylvania Railroad's West Jersey & Seashore, which dated from 1896, and Reading Company's Atlantic City Railroad, an 1883 narrow-gauge acquisition. PRSL was among the properties conveyed to Conrail on April 1, 1976. Lehigh & Hudson River Railway Warwick Valley opened in 1862 as 6-foot-gauge line, standard-gauged in 1880. It was extended southwest as Lehigh & Hudson River, a name adopted for both lines in 1882.

Fascinating history of the how the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Reading Railroad, after years of determined competition, merged their New Jersey lines to create the Seashore Lines. The railroads to the shore were once called the spine of the beaches, serving the summer visitors and freight needs of the area for decades. The author covers the rivalry, including the dueling ferry services across the Delaware River, and then follows the merger through the good years and the bad, ending with the takeover by Conrail in 1976. Illustrated on almost every page with informatively captioned black and white photos. With steam, diesel and passenger equipment rosters, maps and timetables. 104 pages.