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by William Alexander Gerhardie

Author: William Alexander Gerhardie
Language: English
Publisher: Macdonald and Co; New edition edition (1973)
Pages: 400 pages
Category: No category
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit docx lrf rtf

William Alexander Gerhardie OBE FRSL (21 November 1895 – 15 July 1977) was an Anglo-Russian novelist and playwright. His first novel, Futility (1922), drew on his experiences of fighting the Bolsheviks in pre-revolutionary Russia.

William Alexander Gerhardie OBE FRSL (21 November 1895 – 15 July 1977) was an Anglo-Russian novelist and playwright.

Gerhardie seems to have run out of ideas for fiction, so he turned to autobiography and often referred to the origins of. .I was led to this book of literary memoirs via William Boyd's wonderful novel, "Any Human Heart"

Gerhardie seems to have run out of ideas for fiction, so he turned to autobiography and often referred to the origins of fiction in his experience. Evelyn Waugh seems to have been right, however, when he observed that Gerhardie's early books (novels) were his best work. I was led to this book of literary memoirs via William Boyd's wonderful novel, "Any Human Heart". Gerhardie was a fringe figure, novelist and essayist, of England's early to mid twentieth century literary world. This book of literary memoirs is most entertaining, with a cast of famous (mostly English) writers and personalities viewed from an amusing, oblique and entirely unique angle.

William Alexander Gerhardie (21 November 1895 – 15 July 1977) was a British (Anglo-Russian) novelist and playwright. After a period of poverty-stricken oblivion, he lived to see two 'definitive collected works' published by Macdonald (in 1947-49 and then revised again in 1970-74). William Gerhardie by Norman Ivor Lancashire (1927-2004). An idiosyncratic study of world history between 1890 and 1940 ("God's Fifth Column") was discovered among his papers and published posthumously.

William Gerhardie by Norman Ivor Lancashire (1927-2004). Photograph by Stella Harpley Gerhardie (or Gerhardi: he added the 'e' in later years as an affectation) was one of the most critically acclaimed English novelists of the 1920s (Evelyn Waugh told him 'I have talent, but you have genius'). Wells also championed his work.

by William Gerhardie.

ISBN 13: 9780356031477.

Memoirs of a polyglot: The autobiography of William Gerhardie (1931). Resurrection (1934) Cassell.

After a period of poverty-stricken oblivion, he lived to see two 'definitive collected works' published by Macdonald in 1947–49, revised in 1970–74 with prefaces by Michael Holroyd who has consistently championed his work. More recently, both Prion and New Directions Press have been reissuing his works. Memoirs of a polyglot: The autobiography of William Gerhardie (1931).

William Alexander Gerhardie () was a British (Anglo Russian) . ISBN 0-87951-421-3 "Memoirs of a polyglot: The autobiography of William Gerhardie". ISBN 0-356-03147-0 "Futility".

William Alexander Gerhardie () was a British (Anglo Russian) novelist and playwright. His next novel, "The Polyglots", is probably his masterpiece (although some argue for "Doom"). Again it deals with Russia (Gerhardie was strongly influenced by the tragi-comic style of Russian writers such as Chekhov who he wrote a study of while in College).

Hilarious, poignant, panoramic in scope, The Polyglots redeems, from the Babel of the interwar period, a stirring vision of love and human sympathy.

Written with rare candour, this is William Gerhardie's enchanting and entertaining memoir of his early life. Gerhardie writes about his grandparents and parents, and about his childhood in St Petersburg where his father, a British cotton manufacturer, settled in the 1890s. He joined the Scots Greys in the First World War, and was commissioned and posted to the British Embassy at Petrograd, where he saw the Russian revolution in various stages. At Oxford, he wrote Futility, the first of his novels.