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by Nell Kimball,Stephen Longstreet

Author: Nell Kimball,Stephen Longstreet
Language: English
Publisher: MacMillan Publishing Company; 1st edition (May 1970)
Pages: 286 pages
Category: No category
Rating: 4.9
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Her Life as an American Madam.

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Published 1970 by Macmillan in . Written in English. Biography, Prostitutes. Nell Kimball (1854-1934).

There "Goldie Brown," later knows as Nell Kimball, made her fame & fortune as a 1st-class entrepreneur in the flesh trade. Her "Every girl is sitting on her fortune if only she knew i. Thus advised by her fading Aunt Letty, the young farm girl set out on her odyssey of sin & seduction in the big cities-late 19th century St Louis, San Francisco & New Orleans. There "Goldie Brown," later knows as Nell Kimball, made her fame & fortune as a 1st-class entrepreneur in the flesh trade.

Longstreet's book, Nell Kimball: Her Life as an American Madam, by herself, is a hoax biography that was partly plagiarized from the works of. .The world of jazz was a constant theme throughout Longstreet's life.

Longstreet's book, Nell Kimball: Her Life as an American Madam, by herself, is a hoax biography that was partly plagiarized from the works of Herbert Asbury, as was his novel The Wilder Shore from Ashbury's The Barbary Coast. Longstreet's nonfiction works include San Francisco, '49 to '06 and Chicago: 1860 to 1920, as well as A Century on Wheels, The Story of Studebaker and a Jewish cookbook, The Joys of Jewish Cooking, that he wrote with his wife and occasional collaborator, Ethel.

Nell Kimball was self-taught. She made a life for herself from nothing. She was a tough survivor with a real head for business and marketing. It makes you wonder what she could have achieved with an education. Even though she was a madam the two men she picked to marry weren't worthy of her. If she had found a good man and left the life then she probably wouldn't have wrote the book. Of particular interest were all the sections devoted to the payoff (with money and/or sexual favors) of all of those (wink,wink) respectable, upstanding government officials and politicians.

Nell Kimball operated lavish houses in San Francisco and New Orleans and began her red velvet catering as a worker in the .

Nell Kimball operated lavish houses in San Francisco and New Orleans and began her red velvet catering as a worker in the vineyards in St. Louis. She wrote her story after her retirement from public service in 1917 when her New Orleans house was closed. The first chapter, ""My Last House,"" contains a Principles and Philosophy run-down (""I never had truck with the idea whores had hearts of gold. Linen is a big item""). 286 pp. New York: The Macmillan Company. Nell never went to school, but she had a quick, retentive mind, a sharp eye for detail and a keen appreciation of life's truths and ironies. She also had, in her own words, a hell of a yen to live. It kept her going in the sex trade.

Published 1981 by Granada in London, Toronto. Louisiana, New Orleans, United States. N4 K5, HQ146N6 K55 1981.

"Every girl is sitting on her fortune if only she knew it." Thus advised by her fading Aunt Letty, the young farm girl set out on her odyssey of sin and seduction in the big cities - late nineteenth century St. Louis, San Francisco, and New Orleans. There "Goldie Brown," later knows as Nell Kimball, made her fame and fortune as a first-class entrepreneur in the flesh trade. Her compelling memoir, complete, uncut, and narrated with the skill of a born storyteller, is one of the most honest, earthy, and penetrating portraits of her era ever recorded: Nell Kimball: Her Life as An American Madam, by Herself. "Looking back on my life, and it's the only way I can look at it now, nothing in it came out the way most people would want their life to be lived. And while I began at fifteen in St. Louis in a good house with no plans, just wanting as a young whore to hunker on to something to eat and something good to wear, I ended up as a business woman, becoming a sporting house madam, recruiting, disciplining whores, running high-class places. Always wondering, too, why it had happened just that way. Now I can say, if I ever had me any remorse, I never had any regrets." So begin the remarkable reminiscences of Nell Kimball, who made history as one of the shrewdest, classiest operators in America until 1917, the year the government closed Storyville, the official sporting section of New Orleans. Funny, frank, and uninhibited, she tells her astonishing story with inimitable style and gusto, a story made public for the first time since it was completed in 1932. From it emerges a razor-sharp intelligence, a biting humor, and an unparalleled commentator on her times. As editor Stephen Longstreet observes, "It was a society whose cant and hypocrisy, fears and conformity she recognized and often indicted in her writing. If she was particularly hard on politicians, it should be remembered that she knew them more intimately than most of us."