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by S.V Lobachev

Author: S.V Lobachev
Language: Russian
Publisher: Iskusstvo-SPb (January 1, 2003)
Pages: 416 pages
Category: No category
Rating: 4.1
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Patriarch Nikon was the seventh Patriarch of all Russia. In his official capacity, Nikon was frequently sent to Moscow to collect alms for the monastery. On one of his trips he was introduced to Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich

Patriarch Nikon was the seventh Patriarch of all Russia. He initiated religious reforms that split the Russian Orthodox Church, leading to the formation of the ‘Old Believers’ movement. Nikon was born into a peasant family in Central Russia. His mother died shortly after he was born, so his father married another woman. On one of his trips he was introduced to Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich. The ruler was moved by Nikon’s devotion and education, and soon appointed him as archimandrite to a prominent and wealthy Novospassky monastery in Moscow.

Nikon (Russian: Ни́кон, Old Russian: Нїконъ), born Nikita Minin (Никита Минин; 7 May 1605 – 17 August 1681) was the seventh Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus' of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Nikon (Russian: Ни́кон, Old Russian: Нїконъ), born Nikita Minin (Никита Минин; 7 May 1605 – 17 August 1681) was the seventh Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus' of the Russian Orthodox Church, serving officially from 1652 to 1666. He was renowned for his eloquence, energy, piety and close ties to Tsar Alexis of Russia. Nikon introduced many reforms which eventually led to a lasting schism known as Raskol in the Russian Orthodox Church

Nikon of Moscow (1605-81) was patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church from 1652 to 1658, during which he oversaw and enforced extensive revision of the church service books and practices in Russia to bring them in line with the books and practices . .

Nikon of Moscow (1605-81) was patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church from 1652 to 1658, during which he oversaw and enforced extensive revision of the church service books and practices in Russia to bring them in line with the books and practices of the Churches of Constantinople, Jerusalem, and Alexandria.

Nikon, born Nikita Minin was the seventh Patriarch of Moscow and all the Rus' of the Russian Orthodox Church . In December 1666, Nikon was tried by a synod of church officials, deprived of all his sacerdotal functions, and reduced to the status of a simple monk. lt;/p

Patriarch Nikon and Epifany Slavinetsky revising service-books. Nikon launched bold reforms. He consulted the most learned of the Greek prelates abroad, invited them to a consultation at Moscow, and finally the scholars of Constantinople and Kiev convinced Nikon that the Muscovite service-books were heterodox, and that the icons actually in use had very widely departed from the ancient Constantinopolitan models, being for the most part imbued with the Frankish and Polish (West European).

Nikón (es); Nyikon moszkvai pátriárka (hu); Nikón (ast); Никон (ru); Nikon, Patriarch Moscfa (cy); Нікан (be); پاتریارک نیکون مسکو (fa); Никон (bg); Patriarch of Moscow and of Russia Nikon (da); Nikon al Moscovei (ro); ニーコン (ja); Nikon (patriarche de. Moscou) (mg); Nikon (sv). Moscou) (mg); Nikon (sv); Нікон (uk); Nicon (la); Никон (mdf); Patriarkka Nikon (fi); Nikono (eo); Nikon (cs); Nikon (it); Nikon (fr); Патриарх Никăн (cv); Никон (myv); Patriarch of Moscow and of Russia Nikon (pt); Patriarg Nikon van.

Nikon, religious leader who unsuccessfully attempted to establish the primacy of the Orthodox church over the state in.With their backing, Nikon became first metropolitan of Novgorod (1648) and then patriarch of Moscow and all Russia (1652).

Nikon, religious leader who unsuccessfully attempted to establish the primacy of the Orthodox church over the state in Russia and whose reforms that attempted to bring the Russian church in line with the traditions of Greek Orthodoxy led to a schism. Nikon accepted the highest post in the Russian church only on condition that he be given full authority in matters of dogma and ritual.

Nikita Minov Nikon was patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church from 1652 to 1666. He enacted the reforms of Church books and practices which resulted in a split, or schism, in the Russian Orthodox Church. In 1624 Nikon became a priest in the village of Kolychevo but within 2 years was called to a parish in Moscow. When three of his children died, Nikon sought repentance and solitude. He renounced his wife and family and lived as a monk and hermit from 1634 to 1646.

This book is a historical study of the era of Patriarch Nikon, one of the outstanding figures of Russian history .

This book is a historical study of the era of Patriarch Nikon, one of the outstanding figures of Russian history in the seventeenth century.

This book studies the time of the patriarch Nikon of Moscow (1605-1681), one of the best known Russian Orthodox Church leaders. The author, a professor of history at St. Petersburg University, tells the story of his life as well as the story of the political relations between the Church and the state. The six years of Nikon's tenure (1652-1658) were filled with significant events. Thanks to the support of Tsar Aleksei Mikhailovich, Nikon accumulated great power in his hands, which he used to conduct the reforms to bring clerical traditions into line with contemporary Greek customs. The crisis related with these reforms weakened the Church and caused the deposition of the patriarch. Supplements (pp. 282-376) include several sources published for the first time, bibliography (pp. 377-396), and indices.