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Download A framework for incorporating indigenous knowledge systems into agricultural research, extension and NGOs for sustainable agricultural development (Studies in technology and social change series) djvu

by Bhakthavatsalam Rajasekaran

Author: Bhakthavatsalam Rajasekaran
Language: English
Publisher: Technology and Social Change Program, Iowa State University (1994)
Category: No category
Rating: 4.3
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Ames, IA: Technology and Social Change Program, Iowa State University.

Studies in Technology and Social Change No. 21. Ames, IA: Technology and Social Change Program, Iowa State University. What is indigenous knowledge? Indigenous knowledge is local knowledge that is unique to a given culture or society (Warren, 1987).

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations.

PDF Many of agricultural extension authorities convinced that the key successful of innovations adoption by farmers on study . Conference: The First National Student Conference on Agricultural Extension and Education. Shiraz University, Iran. 16th- 17th December 2009.

PDF Many of agricultural extension authorities convinced that the key successful of innovations adoption by farmers on study and used small native systems, Indigenous peoples knowledge and to combine them up to modern knowledge's and technologies  . At Shiraz, Iran, Volume: 1.

The Agricultural Knowledge,and Information Systems (AKIS) and .

The Agricultural Knowledge,and Information Systems (AKIS) and the Agricultural Innovation. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. These approaches leave little room for farmers' IK to be incorporated into knowledge and information systems. The predominant approach of agricultural extension and outreach programs in developing countries, is based on the assumption that knowledge is created by scientists, to be packaged and spread by extension and to be adopted by farmers (Assefa et a. 2009), and thus it is not tailored to farmers' needs.

During the past fifty years, agricultural development policies have been .

During the past fifty years, agricultural development policies have been remarkably successful at emphasizing external inputs as the means to increase food production. This has led to growth in global consumption of pesticides, inorganic fertilizer, animal feed-stuffs, and tractors and other machinery. A necessary condition for sustainable agriculture is that large numbers of farming households must be motivated to use coordinated resource management.

The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) was a three-year international collaborative effort (2005–2007) initiated by the World Bank in 2002, which evaluated the relevance, quality and e. .

The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) was a three-year international collaborative effort (2005–2007) initiated by the World Bank in 2002, which evaluated the relevance, quality and effectiveness of agricultural knowledge, science, and technology, and the effectiveness of public and private sector policies and institutional arrangements.

Studies in Technology and Social Change N. 0 . Ames: Iowa State University, Technology and Social Change Programme. and Patel, ., (1992). Indigenous natural-resource management system for sustainable agricultural development-A global perspective, J Intern dev 3 (4): 387-401. Rhoades, R. and Bebbington, A. (1995).

Generally, agricultural extension can be defined as the delivery of information inputs to farmers. The role of extension services is invaluable in teaching farmers how to improve their productivity. For Sustainable Intensification to succeed, smallholders need to build up their understanding of farming systems and capacity to innovate within their own particular ecosystems.

This is a collation of knowledge regarding the practice of extension and is not intended to be used as a recipe or blue print

The challenges the sector is facing are ever increasing and becoming more complex. This is a collation of knowledge regarding the practice of extension and is not intended to be used as a recipe or blue print. Based on the context and the requirement, the approaches and tools should be selected, adapted and used.