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Download Spot: The Rise of Political Advertising on Television djvu

Download Spot: The Rise of Political Advertising on Television djvu

by Edwin; Bates Stephen Diamond

Author: Edwin; Bates Stephen Diamond
Language: English
Publisher: MIT PRESS (1988)
Category: No category
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc lrf lit mbr

The Spot will go a long way toward helping the reader understand the televised political advertising that's . Genuinely funny and sophisticated examinations here. But, Ed Diamond is a saint.

The Spot will go a long way toward helping the reader understand the televised political advertising that's about to swamp u. -The Washington Post. One person found this helpful.

Edwin Diamond, Stephen Bates

Edwin Diamond, Stephen Bates.

The Rise of Political Advertising on Television. Edwin Diamond and Stephen Bates 1992.

Stephen Bates, a lawyer, is a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars in Washington, . They evaluate the proposals to ban or severely restrict the spot. They also assess the growing press scrutiny of TV campaigns, such as the use of "truth boxes" in newspapers. He is the author of If No News, Send Rumors: Anecdotes of American Journalism.

Diamond, Edwin; Bates, Stephen, 1958 .

Diamond, Edwin; Bates, Stephen, 1958-. Advertising, Political, Television advertising. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 27, 2012.

The top news of media analyst Diamond's latest book, in collaboration with Harvard political scientist Bates, is that TV political advertising seldom if ever decides an election, and remains a ""problematic ar. "

The top news of media analyst Diamond's latest book, in collaboration with Harvard political scientist Bates, is that TV political advertising seldom if ever decides an election, and remains a ""problematic ar. " But certain modes and styles do produce certain effects; and there are, as charged, some problems.

But, Ed Diamond is a saint. Is Steven Bates, Satan Starr's author the handmaid of the Devil? Popular Categories. Teen and Young Adult. Literature & Fiction. Mystery & Thriller.

Recommend this journal. -The Washington Post

The Spot will go a long way toward helping the reader understand the televised political advertising that's about to swamp u. About the Author: Stephen Bates, a lawyer, is a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars in Washington, .

In this third edition of their classic study of the political commercial, or "polispot," veteran media analysts Edwin Diamond and Stephen Bates reveal the backstage stories of the 1988 presidential campaign - the Ailes-Atwater media mastery, the Dukakis team's babel of TV voices, Willie Horton's transformation from convict to celebrity. The authors take a close critical look at the key political ads of 1988 and 1990, with particular attention to the subtexts directed at voters' racial attitudes and fears. They also preview the 30-second arguments and attacks of the 1992 media campaign.In a new chapter, Diamond and Bates examine the case against spots. They take a hard look at the societal ills that critics have blamed on TV campaigns, including mudslinging, misrepresentation, and malaise. They evaluate the proposals to ban or severely restrict the spot. They also assess the growing press scrutiny of TV campaigns, such as the use of "truth boxes" in newspapers. Their verdict on political ads will surprise many viewers - and cheer all friends of the First Amendment.As the media consultants and their handiwork grow more subtle and sophisticated, and as political campaigns increasingly exist only on the home screen, The Spot is an indispensable guide for the campaign season.Edwin Diamond is Professor of journalism at New York University, where he directs the News Study Group, and he is the media columnist for New York Magazine. His previous books include The Media Show: The Changing Face of the News, 1985-1990. Stephen Bates, a lawyer, is a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. He is the author of If No News, Send Rumors: Anecdotes of American Journalism.