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by John E. Gedo

Author: John E. Gedo
Subcategory: Medicine
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (May 1, 1996)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Medicine
Rating: 4.4
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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. In this remarkable survey of "e;the communicative repertory of humans,"e; John Gedo demonstrates the central importance to theory and therapeutics of the communication of information. Then, turning to the analytic dialogue, Gedo explores the implications of these alternative modes of communication for.

The Foundations of Psychoanalysis: A Philosophical Critique is a 1984 book by the philosopher Adolf Grünbaum, in which the author offers a philosophical critique of the work of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. Grünbaum evaluates the status of psychoanalysis as a natural science, criticizes the method of free association and Freud's theory of dreams, and discusses the psychoanalytic theory of paranoia

In this remarkable survey of "the communicative repertory of humans," John Gedo demonstrates the central importance to theory and therapeutics of the communication of information.

John E. Gedo, . He is the author of numerous books, including Conceptual Issues in Psychoanalysis and Portraits of th. .

is Training and Supervising Analyst, Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis, and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of Illinois School of Medicine. He is the author of numerous books, including Conceptual Issues in Psychoanalysis and Portraits of the Artist, both Analytic Press publications. Библиографические данные.

Gedo does not proffer semiotics as a substitute for metapsychology. He is explicit that communicative skill is always dependdent on somatic events within the central nervous system.

Gedo does not proffer semiotics as a substitute for metapsychology. Indeed, it is because Gedo's hierarchical approach to communication builds on our current understanding of a hierarchically organized central nervous system that his clincal observations become insights into basic psychobiological functioning.

Author(s) : John E. Gedo. Publisher : Analytic Press. Pages : 224. Category : Psychoanalysis. ISBN 13 : 9780881631869. ISBN 10 : 0881631868. Also by John E. This survey of "the communicative repertory of humans" demonstrates the central importance of the theory and therapeutics of the communication of information. It explores modes of communication encountered in psychoanalysis, such as protolinguistic phenomena, and analytic dialogue.

Psychoanalysis was once considered primarily a humanistic enterprise Gedo presents his case in three sections

Psychoanalysis was once considered primarily a humanistic enterprise. The psychoanalyst was a philosopher and an artist, adept at deciphering the communications and intrapsychic behaviors of the unique individual. He or she could rely on intuition alone to obtain good results. In this provocative study, John E. Gedo asserts that biological information is essential to successful and comprehensive psychoanalysis. Gedo presents his case in three sections. The first is devoted to the controversies surrounding psychoanalysis as a discipline.

In this remarkable survey of "the communicative repertory of humans," John Gedo demonstrates the central importance to theory and therapeutics of the communication of information

In this remarkable survey of "the communicative repertory of humans," John Gedo demonstrates the central importance to theory and therapeutics of the communication of information. ISBN13:9781138881624.

In this remarkable survey of "the communicative repertory of humans," John Gedo demonstrates the central importance to theory and therapeutics of the communication of information. He begins by surveying those modes of communication encountered in psychoanalysis that go beyond the lexical meaning of verbal dialogue, including "the music of speech," various protolinguistic phenomena, and the language of the body. Then, turning to the analytic dialogue, Gedo explores the implications of these alternative modes of communication for psychoanalytic technique. Individual chapters focus, in turn, on the creation of a "shared language" between analyst and analysand, the consequences of the analytic setting, the form in which the analyst casts particular interventions, the curative limits of empathy, the analyst's affectivity and its communication to the patient, and the semiotic significance of countertransference and projective identification.

Gedo does not proffer semiotics as a substitute for metapsychology. He is explicit that communicative skill is always dependdent on somatic events within the central nervous system. Indeed, it is because Gedo's hierarchical approach to communication builds on our current understanding of a hierarchically organized central nervous system that his clincal observations become insights into basic psychobiological functioning. Grounded in Gedo's four decades of clinical experience, The Languages of Psychoanalysis points to a new venue of clinical research and conceptualization, one in which attentiveness to issues of communication will not only foster linkages with contemporary neuroscience, but also clarify and enlarge the therapeutic possibilities of psychoanalytic treatment.