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by World Bank

Author: World Bank
Subcategory: Medicine
Language: English
Publisher: World Bank Publications (August 1, 2004)
Pages: 128 pages
Category: Medicine
Rating: 4.4
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With almost half the world¡¯s population, Asia will determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. There is a significant risk of a large-scale HIV/AIDS epidemic in the region.

With almost half the world¡¯s population, Asia will determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. And many countries have already begun the fight: lessons have been learned in various contexts, including experiences from Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. Governments, civil society, and other partners are key players in this response.

HIV/AIDS is therefore a multisectoral development challenge and, consequently, a. .

HIV/AIDS is therefore a multisectoral development challenge and, consequently, a corporate priority for the World Bank. This report outlines a strategic direction for the World Bank in its multisectoral response to HIV/AIDS in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) Region. It describes the risk of a large-scale HIV/AIDS epidemic in the region. It also spells out what can be done to avert the growth of HIV/AIDS-and what government, civil society, and other partners are doing. And it identifies how the World Bank can assist at the country and regional levels.

Asia, with almost half the world's population, could determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. This booklet outlines a strategic direction for the World Bank in its response to HIV/AIDS in the East Asian and Pacific region

Asia, with almost half the world's population, could determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. This booklet outlines a strategic direction for the World Bank in its response to HIV/AIDS in the East Asian and Pacific region.

Key affected populations in Asia and the Pacific. When the HIV epidemic began in Asia and the Pacific, it was heavily concentrated among sex workers and their clients. Men who have sex with men (MSM). The HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men is growing. This has serious knock-on effects for obtaining both health-related information and developing effective health policies and programmes to support this population. 27 This social exclusion, coupled with a lack of employment opportunities, means that many transgender people in the region engage in sex work.

Health, Nutrition, and Population Series This series is produced by the Health, Nutrition, and Population Family (HNP) of the World Bank’s Human Development Network.

In 2008, . million people in Asia were living with HIV according to the United Nations (UN). The UN believes that Asia's epidemic peaked in the mid-1990s, and annual HIV incidence has subsequently declined by more than half

In 2008, . The UN believes that Asia's epidemic peaked in the mid-1990s, and annual HIV incidence has subsequently declined by more than half. Regionally, the epidemic has remained somewhat stable since 2000. Compared with other regions, notably Africa and the Americas, the national HIV prevalence levels in East Asia are very low (. % in the adult (15-49) group).

Publications of the World Health Organization can be obtained from Marketing and Dissemination, World Health . The first published by the WHO Regional Offices for the South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions report on HIV in the Asia Pacific region was in 2001 and was well received.

The first published by the WHO Regional Offices for the South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions report on HIV in the Asia Pacific region was in 2001 and was well received. Within the framework of UNAIDS, WHO plays a leading role in the health sector response to HIV/AIDS.

Sound and timely policies can limit the current and future impact of HIV/AIDS on Latin American health care systems, economies, and . Библиографические данные.

Sound and timely policies can limit the current and future impact of HIV/AIDS on Latin American health care systems, economies, and societies. Many countries in Latin America have shown their willingness to address the scope and special nature of the HIV/AIDS problem; since the late 1980s these countries have developed new structures and the groundwork needed for community responses. However, many challenges still lie ahead.

With almost half the world's population, Asia will determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

With almost half the world's population, Asia will determine the future of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. There is a significant risk of a large-scale HIV/AIDS epidemic in the region. And many countries have already begun the fight: lessons have been learned in various contexts, including experiences from Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. Governments, civil society, and other partners are key players in this response. However, with new methods of funding, issues of capacity, and an evolving epidemic, responses must take into account five key challenges: political commitment and multisectoral support; public health surveillance and monitoring and evaluation; prevention; care, support, and treatment; and health services delivery.

Addressing HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific identifies options for how the World Bank, in close partnership with government, civil society and other partners, can assist in the response at the country and regional levels. It stresses the need for country specific strategies to address the diversity of issues within the region and highlights the importance of analytic and advisory work in this area to support ongoing and planned programs as well as capacity building efforts.