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Download Organ and Tissue Donation: Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues (Medical Humanities Series) djvu

by Assistant Professor Bethany Spielman M.H.A. Ph.D. J.D.

Author: Assistant Professor Bethany Spielman M.H.A. Ph.D. J.D.
Subcategory: Administration & Medicine Economics
Language: English
Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (November 1, 1996)
Pages: 216 pages
Category: Medicine
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit doc mbr lrf

How should organs be obtained and from whom? What should be the role of. .

How should organs be obtained and from whom? What should be the role of financial incentives? . This book should be enlightening for practicing clinicians, bioethicists, students, policy analysts, and others interested in the technological and ethical impacts of medicine on society.

Organ and Tissue Donation book.

. Her publications have been cited in more than 250 medical, legal, scientific, nursing, and humanities journals and books in English, Spanish, French, German and Serbian, including.

is associate professor of medical humanities and health law at Southern Illinois University’s School of Medicine and School of Law, and director of the medical school’s medical ethics program.

Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical .

Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals.

Download Donation: Organ Policy Ethical, Legal, Issues and Tissue Humanities and Series) (Medical pdf for free. Organ and Tissue Donation: Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues (Medical Humanities Series) pdf. 0809321076 epub.

ethical and legal issues in medical practice. Mathiharan K, Amrit K Patnaik. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Medical Practice. In: Modi's Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence, 23 rd edn. New Delhi; Lexis Nexis Butterworths, 2006: 77- 216. Lack of regular CMEs on medical ethics and. medico-legal issues, over-confidence, less.

Although tissue donation is addressed in the National Organ Transplant Act of.Lainie Friedman Ross, .

Although tissue donation is addressed in the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, the organization and the operation of tissue banks do not follow systems used for solid organs. In the 1980s, local tissue banks began to proliferate. Chapters in part IV address other ethical and policy issues, including the process and substance of informed consent. Although there is consensus that the consent process must be improved, proxy consent by family members will always be inadequate, given the less-than-ideal circumstances in which it is obtained.

Medical humanities is an interdisciplinary field of medicine which includes the humanities (philosophy, ethics, history, comparative literature and religion), social science ( psychology, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, health geography) .

Medical humanities is an interdisciplinary field of medicine which includes the humanities (philosophy, ethics, history, comparative literature and religion), social science ( psychology, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, health geography) and the arts (literature, theater, film, and visual arts) and their application to medical education and practice. The core strengths of the medical humanities are the imaginative nonconformist qualities and practices.

Medical ethics set guidelines for proper behavior which support doctors and nurses and other medical professionals in their relations with patients. The codes guide professionals and help them act properly in a particular situation. They involve issues related to integrity and competency, trust and respect. One of the principle tenets of medical ethics in the West is the Hippocratic Oath, thought to have been written around 500 . This oath makes doctors swear that they will practice medicine in an ethical way, always with their patient's best interests as a guiding principle.

A Model Legal and Ethical Donation Framework. Dickens, . ‘Living tissue and organ donors and property law: More on Moore’ (1992) 8 Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Problems 73 at 92. Dickenson, . Property in the Body: Feminist Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 2007), p. 28.

Few contemporary issues question the nature of life and death, families and communities, altruism and self-interest, and individual rights and public good as dramatically as does organ donation and transplantation.

Transplantation raises profound and intriguing concerns about the interplay of medical needs, state authority and bodily integrity. Although advances in medical technology and the development of immunosuppressant drugs have made transplantation an almost routine procedure in many parts of the world, the actual availability of transplantable organs remains inadequate to the need. Accordingly, various strategies and policies are in force to increase the supply of organs.

In this edited volume, Bethany Spielman includes selected papers from a 1995 conference cosponsored by the Department of Medical Humanities of the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and the Live and Learn Organ Donation Awareness Program of the Illinois Secretary of State. Seventeen distinguished experts from the fields of bioethics, medicine, law, history, philosophy, and public policy consider questions integral to the foundations and operations of organ donation in the 1990s: To what extent is policy guided by law, cultural notions of gift giving, scientific facts, or political interests? How should organs be obtained and from whom? What should be the role of financial incentives? Do existing frameworks and protocols in medical centers and surgical suites sufficiently protect and respect living and cadaver donors? Can donations be increased to meet growing demand? Is there a right to refuse donation?

The essays explore a range of specific issues: Third World violation of rights and the "theft" of organs, proposed and proven remedies for the shortage of organs, the unique ethical issues relating to donations by children, the recently rescinded American Medical Association decision to approve harvesting of organs from anencephalic infants, and apparent inequities in national and global allocation.

This book should be enlightening for practicing clinicians, bioethicists, students, policy analysts, and others interested in the technological and ethical impacts of medicine on society.