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by Toby Carlson

Author: Toby Carlson
Subcategory: Earth Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge (May 14, 1992)
Pages: 512 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf azw lrf txt

Carlson has written a profound book on synoptic systems.

Carlson has written a profound book on synoptic systems. Unlike many meteorology texts, this book stresses physical understanding of synoptic systems through practical and lucid mathematical treatment. The physical insight Carlson provides so eloquently makes this an essential read for every student taking synoptic lab. Carlson explains abstruse topics (thermal vorticity for example) in a lucid and cogent manner. There are numerous case studies which are covered in depth and flow perfectly with the points Carlson wants to convey.

The subject matter is mid-latitude synoptic weather systems, by which I imply a scale of motion that can be treated . The contribution of this book to weather forecasting is the body of insights contained herein

The subject matter is mid-latitude synoptic weather systems, by which I imply a scale of motion that can be treated adequately using quasi-geostrophic theory. The material is subject to some constraints: the subjects would take one or two semesters to cover and the illustrations focus on case studies and topics with which I am intimately familiar. The contribution of this book to weather forecasting is the body of insights contained herein. Of course, I do use models to illustrate the atmospheric behavior, and I constantly refer to the historical development of different concepts and models.

Mid-Latitude Weather Systems book. With the use of well-documented case studies, Toby Carlson has achieved a unique presentation of selected concepts, which facilitate a clear interpretation of this active and challenging area Mid-Latitude Weather Systems is the first text to make extensive use of conventional weather charts and equations to fully illustrate the behavior and evolution of weather patterns.

First published in 1991 and reprinted in 1994 and 1998, Mid-Latitude Weather Systems has become a classic text in synoptic meteorology. It is the first text to make extensive use of conventional weather charts and equations to illustrate fully the behavior and evolution of weather patterns. Turning to well-documented case studies, Toby Carlson presents selected concepts in a unique way, facilitating the interpretation of this active and challenging area of study.

Book for an introductory course in Sinoptic Meteorology. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Categories: Physics\Physics of the Atmosphere. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Synoptic and dynamic meteorology are both concerned with the motions of the atmosphere and their effect on weather and climate. This would be a good supplement to Bluestein's two volume text on Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology (Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Midlatitudes: Volume II: Observations and Theory of Weather Systems, Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Midlatitudes: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics, Vol. 1. Some knowledge of dynamics is assumed, but is a good reference for meteorologists.

The overriding philosophy of this textbook, and its great strength, is the integration of synoptics and dynamics. This integration is centered around the development of quasigeostrophic dynamics and its applicationto isturbances.

Bibliographic information. Mid-latitude Weather Systems.

References to this book. Bibliographic information.

Synoptic and dynamic meteorology are both concerned with the motions of the atmosphere and their effect on weather and climate. Synoptic meteorology is primarily concerned with putting together observations in order to understand or predict the weather. Dynamic meteorology is more concerned with quantitative relationships (equations), particularly those equations that govern the motion of the air. This course attempts to provide a fusion in which the behaviour of synoptic-scale weather patterns are described in relation to the governing equations. In order to see clearly how the dynamics operate, it is necessary to remain as simple as possible without violating mathematical principles or ignoring important components in the equations.