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by David B. Lurie

Author: David B. Lurie
Subcategory: Earth Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Asia Center (November 14, 2011)
Pages: 524 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.9
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The grandiose title declaring "Realms of Literacy" is the first clue that this book is as much a postmodernism inflected polemic as a study of Japanese writing.

Drawing upon the best and most innovative theories and archaeological discoveries in Japanese scholarship, it develops these in interesting and original ways and situates the significance of writing in early Japan in the broader context of a world history of writing. The grandiose title declaring "Realms of Literacy" is the first clue that this book is as much a postmodernism inflected polemic as a study of Japanese writing. The subtitle's claim to elucidate something relating to the "History of Writing" is as misleading as the title itself.

Harvard East Asian Monographs 335. Realms of Literacy. Early Japan and the History of Writing. David B. Lurie explores the complex processes of adaptation and invention that defined the early Japanese transition from orality to textuality. Drawing on archaeological and archival sources varying in content, style, and medium, this book highlights the diverse modes and uses of writing that coexisted in a variety of configurations among different social groups.

In his recent book, Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the . context of the history of writing in general. Lurie begins the book with the presentation.

In his recent book, Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing, David. Lurie explicates the complicated writing system of Japan and its developmental. history up to the 19th century. It gives a clear picture of how the. Japanese writing system has developed and where it sits within other writing systems. of some early evidence of writing in the Japanese archipelago where characters were. inscribed/admired as artefacts and sometimes used to show power and authority.

In the world history of writing, Japan presents an unusually detailed record of transition to literacy. Extant materials attest to the social, cultural, and political contexts and consequences of the advent of writing and reading, from the earliest appearance of imported artifacts with Chinese inscriptions in the first century BCE, through the production of texts within the Japanese archipelago in the fifth century, to the widespread literacies and the simultaneous rise of a full-fledged state in the late. seventh and eighth centuries.

18 Hiromichi Mori, Kodai no on'in to Nihonshoki no seiritsu (Tokyo: Taishūkan, 1991); Vovin, Alexander, A Descriptive and Comparative Grammar of Western Old Japanese, Part 1 (Folkestone: Global Oriental, 2005); Miyake.

18 Hiromichi Mori, Kodai no on'in to Nihonshoki no seiritsu (Tokyo: Taishūkan, 1991); Vovin, Alexander, A Descriptive and Comparative Grammar of Western Old Japanese, Part 1 (Folkestone: Global Oriental, 2005); Miyake, Marc, Old Japanese: A Phonetic Reconstruction (London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003). 19 Kazuo, Mabuchi, Jōdai no kotoba (Tokyo: Shibundō, 1972)

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Professor Lurie’s first book investigated the development of writing systems in Japan through the Heian period. Entitled Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing, it was awarded the Lionel Trilling Award in 2012. He is currently preparing a new scholarly monograph, tentatively entitled The Emperor’s Dreams: Reading Japanese Mythology.

Realms of literacy : early Japan and the history of writing by David B. Lurie. Rethinking the 1898 Reform Period: Political and Cultural Change in Late Qing China (Harvard East Asian Monographs) by Rebecca E. Karl. The Sea of Learning: Mobility and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Guangzhou by Steven B. Miles. The Secret Window: Ideal Worlds in Tanizakis Fiction (Harvard East Asian Monographs) by Anthony Chambers. A Sense of Place: The Political Landscape in Late Medieval Japan (Harvard East Asian Monographs) by David Spafford. The Song-Yuan-Ming Transition in Chinese History (Harvard East Asian.

Drawing on varied archaeological and archival sources, David B. Lurie highlights the diverse modes and uses of writing that coexisted in Japan between the first and eighth centuries. This book illuminates not only the textual practices of early Japanese civilization but also the comparative history of writing and literacy in the ancient world.