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by Professor David M. Lambert,Professor Hamish G. Spencer

Author: Professor David M. Lambert,Professor Hamish G. Spencer
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (December 1, 1994)
Pages: 504 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi doc docx azw

Developed by Hugh E. H. Paterson in the 1970s, the Recognition Concept of Species stressed the importance of the Specific-Mate Recognition System (SMRS) and offered a view of species which was radically different from the traditional Isolation Concept.

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New Biological Books. Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory and Application. Lambert, Hamish G. Spencer. Michael J. Ryan, "Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory and Application.

In: Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory and Application, David M. Lambert and Hamish G. Spencer (eds), The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore and London. Can flawed statistics be a substitute for real biology? New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 23:51-58. 37. Lane, D. 1997. The teleological argument for special creation. Apologia, 6(l):49-53. David H. Lane has an . c.

Items related to Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory an. .We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites.Home David M. Spencer Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory and Application.

We offer an interpretation of the words and works of Richard Dedekind and the David Hilbert of around 1900 on which they are held to entertain diverging views on the structure of a deductive science. Firstly, it is argued that Dedekind sees the beginnings of a science in concepts, whereas Hilbert sees such beginnings in axioms.

Natural selection on mate recognition may often contribute to speciation, resulting in reproductive character . Speciation and the recognition concept : theory and application.

Natural selection on mate recognition may often contribute to speciation, resulting in reproductive character displacement. Field populations of Drosophila serrata display reproductive character displacement in cuticular hydrocarbons when sympatric with Drosophila birchii. We exposed field sympatric and allopatric populations of D. serrata to experimental sympatry with D. birchii for nine generations. Fundamental Concepts in the Design of Experiments (Saunders College.

Spencer in his book Principles of Biology (1864), proposed a pangenesis theory that involved "physiological units" assumed to be related to specific body parts and responsible for the transmission of characteristics to offspring.

Spencer in his book Principles of Biology (1864), proposed a pangenesis theory that involved "physiological units" assumed to be related to specific body parts and responsible for the transmission of characteristics to offspring

Speciation, range contraction and extinction in the endemic New Zealand King Shag complex.

Alexey Yanchukov, Postdoctoral Fellow, Modelling the Evolutionary Genetics of Parental Effects (supported by the Marsden Fund ). Keywords. Speciation, range contraction and extinction in the endemic New Zealand King Shag complex.

Developed by Hugh E. H. Paterson in the 1970s, the Recognition Concept of Species stressed the importance of the Specific-Mate Recognition System (SMRS) and offered a view of species which was radically different from the traditional Isolation Concept. Paterson held that new species were formed through incidental changes in the SMRS rather than being directly promoted.

In the two decades since Paterson first advanced his theory, evolutionary biologists around the world have had the opportunity to use this approach in their work. Speciation and the Recognition Concept is the first book to bring together a group of leading researchers to examine the relevance of Paterson's ideas today for this important topic in evolutionary biology. Representing a wide variety of viewpoints, the contributors explore the consequences of applying the concept to areas as diverse as the fossil record, insect taxonomy, the structure of mate recognition systems, speciation models, and the concept function in biology.

"The Recognition Concept of species," write the editors, "is important to biology because it represents an innovative approach to the resolution of the problem of biological diversity. The concept is based upon an analysis of the logic and language of species studies. Consequently, it offers significant implications for ideas about the origin of species."