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by Tom Wakeford

Author: Tom Wakeford
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (April 11, 2002)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf mbr

Wakeford illustrates how symbiosis, an idea whose time surely has come, has been the object of open hostility from politically minded biologists, who equated the concept with Communism and totalitarianism.

Wakeford illustrates how symbiosis, an idea whose time surely has come, has been the object of open hostility from politically minded biologists, who equated the concept with Communism and totalitarianism

Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-194) and index

Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-194) and index. Liaisons of Life; Contents; Introduction; CHAPTER 1 Beatrix versus the Botanists; CHAPTER 2 The Wood Wide Web; CHAPTER 3 Hidden Gardens of Atlantis; CHAPTER 4 Bedbugs and Bubble Boys; CHAPTER 5 Atoms of Revolution; CHAPTER 6 Rewriting Genesis; CHAPTER 7 New Gardeners of Eden; Further Reading; Acknowledgments; Index. A fascinating exploration of symbiosis at the microscopic level and its radical extension of Darwinism. Microbes have long been considered dangerous and disgusting - in short, 'scum.

Liaisons of Life book. But Wakeford is able (after a fashion) to go beyond the politics and demonstrate in a most convincing manner that the symbiotic way of life is vastly more important and enormously more widespread than is usually imagined.

Liaisons of life: from hornworts to hippos, how the unassuming microbe has driven evolution. The jury is out: How far can participatory projects go towards reclaiming democracy? P Bryant, M Pimbert

Liaisons of life: from hornworts to hippos, how the unassuming microbe has driven evolution. John Wiley & Sons, 2001. The jury is out: How far can participatory projects go towards reclaiming democracy? P Bryant, M Pimbert.

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A fascinating exploration of symbiosis at the microscopic level and its radical extension of DarwinismMicrobes have long been considered dangerous and disgusting-in short, "scum. But by forming mutually beneficial relationships with nearly every creature, be it alga with animals or zooplankton with zebrafish, microbes have in fact been innovative players in the evolutionary process. Now biologist and award-winning science writer Tom Wakeford shows us this extraordinary process at work.

book by Tom Wakeford.

Author:Wakeford, Tom. Book Binding:Hardback. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. TOM WAKEFORD is a biologist and writer based at the University of Sussex, . He received his degree in natural sciences from Cambridge University and his P. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions. in evolutionary biology from the University of York. His first book, Science for the Earth, was published by Wiley in 1995. In 1996 he was named Young Science Writer of the Year. Country of Publication.

the Unassuming Microbe Has Driven Evolution. 212 pp. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Below the ground, beneath each plant, there is a mass of invisible roots that may extend as far into the soil as the visible plant extends into the air. But the roots are only the start of the nutrient supply chain. The roots, in turn, may be attached to a network of fungi that can reach hundreds of feet farther through the soil.

A fascinating exploration of symbiosis at the microscopic level and its radical extension of Darwinism Microbes have long been considered dangerous and disgusting-in short, "scum." But by forming mutually beneficial relationships with nearly every creature, be it alga with animals or zooplankton with zebrafish, microbes have in fact been innovative players in the evolutionary process. Now biologist and award-winning science writer Tom Wakeford shows us this extraordinary process at work. He takes us to such far-flung locales as underwater volcanoes, African termite mounds, the belly of a cow and even the gaps between our teeth, and there introduces us to a microscopic world at turns bizarre, seductive, and frightening, but ever responsible for advancing life in our macroscopic world. In doing so he also justifies the courage and vision of a series of scientists-from a young Beatrix Potter to Lynn Margulis-who were persecuted for believing evolution is as much a matter of interdependence and cooperation as it is great too-little-told tales of evolutionary science.