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Download Seeds of Wealth: Four plants that made men rich djvu

by Henry Hobhouse

Author: Henry Hobhouse
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Pan Books (March 5, 2004)
Pages: 272 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf doc docx lit

Beyond the four plants in question, this book seems to have no organizing . This fascinating book looks at the causative role of plants in history. Wine has an enormous potential for the creation of wealth, multiplying nett profits wherever it is successful.

Beyond the four plants in question, this book seems to have no organizing principle beyond "we've got to stick everything in somewhere. In one three page tour de force, for example, he manages to discuss the differences between British and Dutch estates in Asia, the use of ships for Haj pilgrims, the key players of WWII, the League of Nations collapse, the problems with American bankers, how the . caused the dismemberment of the British empire (which he still pines for), and the Irish.

Henry Hobhouse was born in Somerset in 1924 and educated at Eton.

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Henry Hobhouse was born in Somerset in 1924 and educated at Eton. From 1946 to 1954 he worked as a journalist for the Economist, News Chronicle, Daily Express, and Wall Street Journal, becoming, in 1948, one of the first Directors of CBS-TV News. His other books are Forces of Change and Seeds of Change.

It describes how mankind's discovery, usage and trade of sugar, tea, cotton, the potato, and quinine have influenced history to make the modern world.

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new industries and changed the course of history. Ancient Rome's monopoly on wine production had huge economic and hygienic importance. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Change.

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Change. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created gre. A highly original interpretation of a wide span of global history through vitally important plants. Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Change

Seeds of Wealth by Henry Hobhouse 272pp, Macmillan, £20. Green Gold: The Empire of Tea by Alan Macfarlane and Iris Macfarlane 320pp . Now, Seeds of Wealth explores the history of four plants that made men rich.

Seeds of Wealth by Henry Hobhouse 272pp, Macmillan, £20. Green Gold: The Empire of Tea by Alan Macfarlane and Iris Macfarlane 320pp, Ebury Press, £1. 9. Henry Hobhouse, who was much applauded for his book Seeds of Change, published in 1985, has done it again. But didn't sugar - one of the plants in Seeds of Change - make men rich? And didn't rubber - one of the plants in Seeds of Wealth - also transform mankind?

Gardening history and trivia enthusiasts will welcome Henry Hobhouse's gorgeous Seeds Of Wealth: Four Plants That Made Men Rich, presenting four .

Gardening history and trivia enthusiasts will welcome Henry Hobhouse's gorgeous Seeds Of Wealth: Four Plants That Made Men Rich, presenting four essays examining the social consequences of exploiting timber, tobacco, rubber and the wine grape. These are cash crops central to world interests for centuries: all have had a major impact on the world - and all have been largely ignored. The cultivation of and trade in these plants created enormous wealth and changed the history of the world in many ways. The chapter on timber is titled The Essential Carpet.

255 pages, B/w illus. Publisher: Macmillan. Images Additional images. In a similar vein to his Seeds of Change, Hobhouse documents the economic history of timber, grapes, rubber and tobacco. 255 pages, B/w illus. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms

In this collection of four essays, Hobhouse focuses on the exploitation of timber, tobacco, rubber, and the wine grape, which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt with them, created new industries, shaped destinies, and changed the course of history. Following the widely celebrated Seeds of Change (1985) comes Seeds of Wealth, a collection of four elegant essays focusing on the economic and cultural consequences of the exploitation of timber, tobacco, rubber, and the wine grape. These cash crops have. Counterpoint LLC. Book Format.

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new industries and changed the course of history. Ancient Rome's monopoly on wine production had huge economic and hygienic importance. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms. Tobacco has largely been condemned for its effects on health and its true role in history ignored. Tobacco has often been used in place of currency and its growth in Virginia supported a colony that produced much of the talent that made Independence possible. Timber shortages led the British Royal Navy to become dependent on American timber. The dearth of timber drove English coal mines deep, which led to the steam pumps, steam engines, and ultimately the Industrial Revolution. These are fascinating stories the effect of minutiae on the great waves of history. 'You cannot help but admire and enjoy the company of a man who takes such a novel and global view of history' Spectator