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Download Beaver Tales: Audrey Tournay and the Aspen Valley Beavers djvu

Download Beaver Tales: Audrey Tournay and the Aspen Valley Beavers djvu

by Audrey Tournay

Author: Audrey Tournay
Subcategory: Biological Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Boston Mills Press; First Softcover Edition edition (May 5, 2003)
Pages: 168 pages
Category: Math and Science
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf rtf mobi lit

Download PDF book format. Wildlife rehabilitation Ontario Parry Sound Region Beavers Reintroduction.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Beaver tales : Audrey Tournay and the Aspen Valley beavers Audrey Tournay. Book's title: Beaver tales : Audrey Tournay and the Aspen Valley beavers Audrey Tournay. National Bibliographic Agency Control Number: 20039011879. Download now Beaver tales : Audrey Tournay and the Aspen Valley beavers Audrey Tournay. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Sharing Beaver Tales has been both joy and privilege. The writer runs the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in Ontario, Canada. It's a sanctuary that accepts all kinds of wildlife and nurses and nurtures them until most of them can be released back into the wild. But the writer has a special affinity for beavers and in addition to the regular work of nursing and nurturing she and individual beavers do a whole lot of education, especially in schools. The writer is both literate and passionate about her subject.

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Tournay is founder of the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, where orphaned or injured moose, raccoons, ravens, skunks, foxes, fawns, woodchucks, muskrats, wolves, a lynx - even a full-grown adult For well over 30 years, Audrey Tournay has rescued and raised beaver kits. She successfully did what wildlife biologists told her was impossible: she reintroduced them to the wild.

For well over 30 years, Audrey Tournay has rescued and raised beaver kits  . Tournay is founder of the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, where orphaned or injured moose, raccoons, ravens, skunks, foxes, fawns, woodchucks, muskrats, wolves, a lynx - even a full-grown adult For well over 30 years, Audrey Tournay has rescued and raised beaver kits.

The sad news of Audrey Tournay's death is a reminder of all the good. she did during her life. She also created what became the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary. Her relationship with beavers began in the '70s, when she took in an injured kit. Over the next 30 years, she rehabilitated dozens of rescued beavers, many of whom had the run of her house. Audrey's heart-warming memoir, Beaver Tales, includes some funny stories about what it's like to have beavers as housemates. This is the story of one woman's crusade to save beavers. The writer runs the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in Ontario, Canada

For well over 30 years, Audrey Tournay has rescued and raised beaver kits.

Here is an exerpt from the book by Audrey Tourney and the Aspen Valley Beavers: Beaver Tales. Beavers play among themselves. They wrestle, arms on each other's shoulders, feet against the other's chest, they push. Over the years I have known many beavers. Some have come to the Sanctuary as very small kits, orphaned and cold and hungry. Some have come as adults, injured, often angry. The objet seems to be to topple your adversary backwards, sidewards or simply down. The escape is to dodge under the other fellow's arm when you can. The teeth, which could be dangerous weapons if the fight were serious, do not come into play at all. (. 7). Tournay is founder of the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, where orphaned or injured moose, raccoons, ravens, skunks, foxes, fawns, woodchucks, muskrats, wolves, a lynx - even a full-grown adult lioness - have come into her care. Yet Tournay has a soft spot for beavers.

For well over 30 years, Audrey Tournay has rescued and raised beaver kits. She successfully did what wildlife biologists told her was impossible: she reintroduced them to the wild.

Tournay is founder of the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, where orphaned or injured moose, raccoons, ravens, skunks, foxes, fawns, woodchucks, muskrats, wolves, a lynx -- even a full-grown adult lioness -- have come into her care. Yet Tournay has a soft spot for beavers. That soft spot has occasionally been her bathroom, a makeshift den behind her woodstove, or on her lap. Her hands-on interaction with many beavers has given her a special understanding of these often misunderstood wetland animals.

These wonderful, moving and often very funny stories reveal life with one of North America's most intelligent, innovative, and inventive wild creatures.