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by Christine Piper,Michael King

Author: Christine Piper,Michael King
Subcategory: Family Law
Language: English
Publisher: Arena; Subsequent edition (April 1, 1995)
Pages: 250 pages
Category: Law
Rating: 4.8
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Michael King is a writer and scholar. He was born in 1945 .

Michael King is a writer and scholar. He is New Zealand's foremost scholar on the history of the Maori people and their culture. King's book, 1000 Years of Maori History: Nga Iwi O Te Motu, examines the origins of the Maori, how their culture responded to the arrival of Europeans, and how it has continued to exist in the face of great odds. Christine Piper is an author who made the shortlist for the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2015 and the Dobbie Literary Award 2015 with her title After Darkness.

How the Law Thinks ab. .It offers many original insights into the relationship between law and child welfare science and provides a critical analysis of decision making about child welfare in several different countries. It concludes by pointing the way to a new era of 'child responsiveness' for courts dealing with issues involving children.

Author:Piper, Christine. How the Law Thinks About Children. Book Binding:Paperback. Book Condition:VERYGOOD. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 4 pre-owned listings.

How the law thinks about children. Michael King, Christine Piper. The family justice system operates with a set of presumptions and assumptions about the welfare of the child which are assumed to be based on 'scientific' knowledge and which, therefore, are furthe. More). Part 1 The limits of welfare/justice. Part 2 Law as a self-referential system. Part 3 The construction of child welfare science. Part 4 The child as semantic artifact. Part 5 The child in mediatio. Investing in children : policy, law and practice in context.

King, Michael and Piper, Christine, How the Law Thinks About Children (Aldershot: Gower, 1990)

King, Michael and Piper, Christine, How the Law Thinks About Children (Aldershot: Gower, 1990). 3. See, for example, Anthony Carty and Jane Mair, Some Post-Modern Perspectives on Law and Society, Journal of Law and Society 17, 4 (1990): 395–410.

How the law thinks about children Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove How the law thinks about children from your list? How the law thinks about children. 2nd ed. by King, Michael.

Find nearly any book by Christine Piper. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Michael King, Christine Piper. ISBN 9781857422269 (978-1-85742-226-9) Softcover, Arena, 1995. Find signed collectible books: 'How the Law Thinks About Children'. Investing in Children: Policy, Law and Practice in Practice. ISBN 9781843923244 (978-1-84392-324-4) Softcover, Willan, 2008.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Christine Piper books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Sentencing and Punishment.

How the law thinks about children Aldershot: Ashgate. King, Michael, and Christine Piper. Law Commission Cohabitation: The financial consequences of relationship breakdown (Law Com No 307) Family fragments? Cambridge. How the law thinks about children, 2nd ed. Aldershot: Ashgate. Cohabitation: The financial consequences of relationship breakdown (Law Com No 307). London: Law Commission. Smart, Carol, and Bren Neale. Family fragments? Cambridge: Polity Press. Passing on: Kinship and inheritance in England.

By: Christine Kisser. Michael King and Christine Piper, How the Law Thinks About Children, Arena, 2nd e. 1995, 191 pages. Publication Date: 01 Jan 1996.

This is one of the most thought-provoking books to appear in recent years on children and the law. How the Law Thinks About Children considers the ways in which legal systems deal with issues of child abuse, child custody and juvenile delinquency by constructing their own 'realities'. This account draws on the recent theoretical ideas of autopoiesis and radical constructivism derived from the writings of Foucault, Habermas, Luhmann and above all, Gunther Teubner. It offers many original insights into the relationship between law and child welfare science and provides a critical analysis of decision making about child welfare in several different countries. It concludes by pointing the way to a new era of 'child responsiveness' for courts dealing with issues involving children.The first edition of this book has been widely recognized as a milestone in sociological analysis of the legal system's role in regulating children and families. This completely revised second edition clarifies and develops several of the theoretical issues that so intrigued readers of the earlier version. It also takes account of recent developments in law and social policy concerning children's welfare.