» » Trials Without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It
Download Trials Without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It djvu

Download Trials Without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It djvu

by William T. Pizzi

Author: William T. Pizzi
Subcategory: Criminal Law
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press; New edition edition (June 1, 2000)
Pages: 257 pages
Category: Law
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt docx lrf doc

Amazing book and so true.

The main problem, in his eyes, is that the system is too preoccupied with judicial procedure and too little concerned with the truth. In a cogent, direct argument, Pizzi inveighs against the triumph of the law of unintended consequences over the law of practicality. Amazing book and so true.

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Louise Woodward: all names that have cast a spotlight on the deficiencies of the American system of criminal justice.

Criminal Procedure Law Books. William T Pizzi About our prices. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything

Criminal Procedure Law Books. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Report incorrect product info or prohibited items. Book Format: Choose an option. Louise Woodward: all names that have cast a spotlight on the deficiencies of the American system of criminal justice. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. So if you find a current lower price from an online retailer on an identical, in-stock product, tell us and we'll match it.

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x, 257 pp. Paper boards over gilt stamped cloth. Our publication program offers reprints of over 800 landmark works as well as original books. We invite offers of antiquarian, scholarly and current practice materials. Founded in 1983, we currently serve thousands of individuals and institutions worldwide. Law books - Out of print, Scholarly, Rare, and Reprints of Legal Classics. We also handle secondhand primary and secondary source material for practicing lawyers.

Law Society Journal,July 2002 Rodney King "Written for a general audience.

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Powell, M, Day, A, Benson, M, Vess, J & Graffam, J 2014, ‘Police officers’ perceptions of interviewing offenders on sex offender registries’, International Journal of Police Science & Management, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 255–66. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Rakoff, J S 2014, ‘Why innocent people plead guilty’, NY Books, November 20 issue.

Reginald Denny. O. J. Simpson. Colin Ferguson. Louise Woodward: all names that have cast a spotlight on the deficiencies of the American system of criminal justice. Yet, in the wake of each trial that exposes shocking behavior by trial participants or results in counterintuitive rulings—often with perverse results—the American public is reassured by the trial bar that the case is not "typical" and that our trial system remains the best in the world.

William T. Pizzi here argues that what the public perceives is in fact exactly what the United States has: a trial system that places far too much emphasis on winning and not nearly enough on truth, one in which the abilities of a lawyer or the composition of a jury may be far more important to the outcome of a case than any evidence.

How has a system on which Americans have lavished enormous amounts of energy, time, and money been allowed to degenerate into one so profoundly flawed?

Acting as an informal tour guide, and bringing to bear his experiences as both insider and outsider, prosecutor and academic, Pizzi here exposes the structural faultlines of our trial system and its paralyzing obsession with procedure, specifically the ways in which lawyers are permitted to dominate trials, the system's preference for weak judges, and the absurdities of plea bargaining. By comparing and contrasting the U.S. system with that of a host of other countries, Trials Without Truth provides a clear-headed, wide-ranging critique of what ails the criminal justice system—and a prescription for how it can be fixed.