» » Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech: The Relationship Between Language and Violence (Contributions in Legal Studies)
Download Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech: The Relationship Between Language and Violence (Contributions in Legal Studies) djvu

Download Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech: The Relationship Between Language and Violence (Contributions in Legal Studies) djvu

by Monore H. Freedman,Eric M. Freedman

Author: Monore H. Freedman,Eric M. Freedman
Subcategory: Constitutional Law
Language: English
Publisher: Praeger (May 30, 1995)
Pages: 384 pages
Category: Law
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf lit

Monore H Freedman; Eric M Freedman. Examines the issue of group defamation from a variety of perspectives.

Monore H Freedman; Eric M Freedman. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. This volume, an updated collection of essays presented by leading scholars at a Hofstra University conference on group defamation, provides a cross-disciplinary examination of hate speech. Beginning with the decision of the . v. St. Paul, the volume analyzes the problem from historical, anthropological, comparative-legal, and American constitutional law perspectives.

By Monroe H. Freedman, Eric M. Freedman. By Monroe H. A particular speech or series of speeches attacking a minority group may not present a clear and present danger of violence. We know from experience, however, that group defamation can create a social climate that is receptive to and encourages hatred and oppression.

Start by marking Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech: The .

Among the topics examined are the role of hate speech in the persecutions of Jews and Asians during World War II, in the subordination of Blacks, Native Americans, and women, and the pros and cons of the legal controls on hate speech adopted in such countries as Australia, Canada, and Israel. 0313292973 (ISBN13: 9780313292972).

This volume, an updated collection of essays presented by leading scholars at a Hofstra University conference on group defamation, provides a cross-disciplinary examination of hate speech.

Are you sure you want to remove Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech from your list? . There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech from your list? Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech. Published May 30, 1995 by Greenwood Press.

Group defamation and freedom of speech. Freedom of political speech, hate speech and the argument from democracy: The transformative contribution of capabilities theory. Contemporary Political Theory, 9(3), 304-324. Gottfried, P. (1996). Do Prohibitions of Hate Speech Harm Public Discourse? Yes: They Have a Chilling Effect on Scholarship and Freedom of Expression. Insight, 12(24), 24-27. The Precedent That Wasnt: College Hate Speech Codes and the 2 Faces of Legal Compliance.

78. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.

Freedom of speech is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or a community to articulate their opinions and ideas without fear of retaliation, censorship, or legal sanction. The term "freedom of expression" is sometimes used synonymously but includes any act of seeking, receiving, and imparting information or ideas, regardless of the medium used.

With Edward Hoffman) What to Study: 101 Fields in a Flash, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1997. Habeas Corpus: Rethinking the Great Writ of Liberty, New York University Press (New York, NY), 2001. How to Transfer to the College of Your Choice, Ten Speed Press (Berkeley, CA), 2002. Contributor to periodicals, including PC Week, Michigan Natural Resources, American Banker, American Medical News, Great Lakes Quarterly, and Treasure.

Eric M. Freedman (Ed. Monroe H.  . This volume, an updated collection of essays from a Hofstra University conference on group defamation, provides a cross-disciplinary examination of hate speech. data.

This volume, an updated collection of essays presented by leading scholars at a Hofstra University conference on group defamation, provides a cross-disciplinary examination of hate speech. Beginning with the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in R.A.V. v. St. Paul, the volume analyzes the problem from historical, anthropological, comparative-legal, and American constitutional law perspectives.

Among the topics examined are the role of hate speech in the persecutions of Jews and Asians during World War II, in the subordination of Blacks, Native Americans, and women, and the pros and cons of the legal controls on hate speech adopted in such countries as Australia, Canada, and Israel. The section on American constitutional law features several proposed statutes outlawing hate speech, along with model court opinions supporting and attacking their constitutionality. The volume will be of great interest to scholars and students in the areas of intergroup relations and constitutional law as well as policy makers.