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by Theodor W. Adorno

Author: Theodor W. Adorno
Subcategory: Radio
Language: English
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2000)
Pages: 139 pages
Category: Humor and Entertainment
Rating: 4.2
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Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno was one of the most important philosophers and social critics in Germany after World War II.

It is in four parts: The Personal Element: n of the Agitator, Thomas’ Methods, The Religious Medium, and Ideological Bait. Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno was one of the most important philosophers and social critics in Germany after World War II.

Theodor W. Adorno (1903-1969) was one of the twentieth century’s most influential thinkers in the areas of. . Adorno (1903-1969) was one of the twentieth century’s most influential thinkers in the areas of social theory, philosophy, aesthetics, and music. This volume reveals another aspect of the work of this remarkable polymath, a pioneering analysis of the psychological underpinnings of what we now call the Radical Right and its use of the media to propagate its political and religious agenda. The now-forgotten Martin Luther Thomas was an American fascist-style demagogue of the Christian right on the radio in the 1930s.

Media Theory Adorno, Theodor. The Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas’ Radio Addresses. Adorno, Theodor and Max Horkheimer. The Culture Industry, The Dialectic of Enlightenment. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000. How to Look at Television, in J. M. Bernstein, e. The Culture Industry. New York: Routledge, 2001. Adorno (alias: Theodor Adorno-Wiesengrund) was born as Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund in.In line with these studies, Adorno produced an analysis of the Californian radio preacher Martin Luther Thomas. Adorno (alias: Theodor Adorno-Wiesengrund) was born as Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund in Frankfurt am Main on September 11, 1903, the only child of Oscar Alexander Wiesengrund (1870–1946) and Maria Calvelli-Adorno della Piana (1865–1952). His mother, a devout Catholic from Corsica, was once a professional singer, while his father, an assimilated Jew who had converted to Protestantism, ran a successful wine-export business.

Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas' Radio Addresses.

The Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas' Radio Addresses. by Theodor W. Adorno. Theodor W. Adorno (1903-1969) was one of the twentieth century's most influential thinkers in the areas of social theory, philosophy, aesthetics, and music.

Using the cultural writings of Theodor W. Adorno as his template and as his foil, Stations of the Cross argues that Focus on the Family radio broadcasts constitute "autonomous" aesthetic objects that lay claim to "truth content" and the possibility of social change. Apostolidis asserts that looking at Focus on the Family as a "coherent, tradition-bound religious phenomenon" endows the program "with a dialectical claim to autonomy from political and economic instrumentalisms.

catalog books, media & more in the Stanford Libraries' collections. Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, 2000. articles+ journal articles & other e-resources.

Martin Luther Thomas, an American fascist-style demagogue who used the radio to appeal to and to manipulate his adherents. The psychological technique of martin luther thomas' radio addresses.

It is a pioneering analysis of a member of what we now call the Radical Right-the now-forgotten Martin Luther Thomas, an American fascist-style demagogue who used the radio to appeal to and to manipulate his adherents. Stanford University Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 1 x . 4 Inches.

The Psychological Techniques of Martin Luther Thomas’ Radio Addresses (Adorno, 2000) echoes Adorno’s analogous critique of the culture industry by detecting an ideological effect, prior to any given content, intrinsic to the form of radio religion. Notwithstanding the text’s narrowness, I argue that Adorno’s analysis of Thomas’ ‘fait accompli technique’-presenting claims as previously established certainties-was both typical of his work and insightful for issues in cultural criticism. First, it refused subjectivist reductions of sociological effects to false consciousness.

Adorno, Theodor W. 2000. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Alexander, Bobby C. 1994. In Knippenberg 1998a: 53-62. Classic Star Trek and the Death of God: A Case Study of 'Who Mourns for Adonais?'" In Porter and McLaren 1999b: 33-59. Babb, Lawrence A. and Susan S. Wadley (ed. Media and the Transformation of Religion in South Asia. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Theodor W. Adorno (1903-1969) was one of the twentieth century’s most influential thinkers in the areas of social theory, philosophy, aesthetics, and music. This volume reveals another aspect of the work of this remarkable polymath, a pioneering analysis of the psychological underpinnings of what we now call the Radical Right and its use of the media to propagate its political and religious agenda. The now-forgotten Martin Luther Thomas was an American fascist-style demagogue of the Christian right on the radio in the 1930s. During these years, Adorno was living in the United States and working with Paul Lazarsfeld on the social significance of radio. This book, Adorno’s penetrating analysis of Thomas’s rhetorical appeal and manipulative techniques, was written in English and is one of Adorno’s most accessible works. It is in four parts: “The Personal Element: Self-Characterization of the Agitator,” “Thomas’ Methods,” “The Religious Medium,”and “Ideological Bait.” The importance of the study is manifold: it includes a theory of fascism and anti-semitism, it provides a methodology for the cultural study of popular culture, and it offers broad reflections on comparative political life in America and Europe. Implicit in the book is an innovative idea about the relation between psychological and sociological reality. Moreover, the study is germane to the contemporary reality of political and religious radio in the United States because it provides an analysis of rhetorical techniques that exploit potentials of psychological regression for authoritarian aims.