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by Sloane Crosley

Author: Sloane Crosley
Subcategory: Humor
Language: English
Publisher: Riverhead Books; First Edition edition (June 15, 2010)
Pages: 288 pages
Category: Humor and Entertainment
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf mbr lrf rtf

Sloane Crosley (born August 3, 1978) is a writer living in New York City and the author of the collections of essays, I Was Told There'd Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number

Sloane Crosley (born August 3, 1978) is a writer living in New York City and the author of the collections of essays, I Was Told There'd Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number. She also worked as a publicist at the Vintage Books division of Random House and as an adjunct professor in Columbia University’s Master of Fine Arts program. She graduated from Connecticut College in 2000.

From the author of the sensational bestseller I Was Told There'd Be Cake comes a new book of personal essays brimming with all the charm and wit that have earned Sloane . To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. or. Download to your computer

From the author of the sensational bestseller I Was Told There'd Be Cake comes a new book of personal essays brimming with all the charm and wit that have earned Sloane Crosley widespread acclaim. Download to your computer. Mac. Windows 8, 8 RT and Modern UI. Windows 8 desktop, Windows 7, XP & Vista.

Crosley's second book of essays "How Did You Get This Number," is at its best in the finale of the nine-chapter follow up to the extraordinarily meh, albeit critically well-received debut, "I Was Told There Would Be Cake

Crosley's second book of essays "How Did You Get This Number," is at its best in the finale of the nine-chapter follow up to the extraordinarily meh, albeit critically well-received debut, "I Was Told There Would Be Cake. The essay "Off the Back of a Truck" is a story of a) meeting and falling for Ben, who is so entrenched in her social circle that it seems impossible they had never met before; b) browsing in an up-scale furniture store, and falling face-first into connection from the stock room who scores her discounted goods with some back alley wheeling.

Sloane Crosley's essays wring humour from a variety of New York humiliations, writes Jessica Holland. When he tells Sloane that life is like a box of chocolates, she says she's heard, you never know what you're going to get. "No, man," he replies. Shit's picked over and it makes your ass fa. It's the type of exchange Crosley is good at: concise, quotable, and part of a story that gets its kicks from rehashing the writer's own misfortunes.

He was now entirely rid of his nervous misgivings, of his forced aggressiveness, of the imperative desire to show himself different from his surroundings. He felt now that his surroundings explained. Nobody questioned the purple; he had only to wear it passively. He had only to glance down at his attire to reassure himself that here it would be impossible for anyone to humiliate hi. oreLess Show More Show Less.

Электронная книга "How Did You Get This Number", Sloane Crosley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "How Did You Get This Number" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Sloane Crosley’s debut essay collection, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, earned her the sort of. .The nine essays collected in How Did You Get This Number depart from the New York-centric universe of Crosley’s first book.

Sloane Crosley’s debut essay collection, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, earned her the sort of accolades that pave the way for disappointment and backlash at the very murmur of a second book. There were blurbs from Jonathan Lethem and . Homes, raves in every magazine that covered the book, and comparisons to Dorothy Parker, Nora Ephron, Fran Lebowitz, and King Midas. It was a lot to live up to on the second go-around.

There's a complex equation that can be used to describe essayist Sloane Crosley's work. The book opens with a story that sees an about-to-turn-30 Crosley getting a passport, spinning the globe on her desk and ending up on a night out in Lisbon with a trio of trainee clowns. It takes in the loneliness of the solitary traveller, the fear of growing older and why holiday towns suck out of season.

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From the author of the sensational bestseller I Was Told There'd Be Cake comes a new book of personal essays brimming with all the charm and wit that have earned Sloane Crosley widespread acclaim, award nominations, and an ever-growing cadre of loyal fans. In Cake readers were introduced to the foibles of Crosley's life in New York City-always teetering between the glamour of Manhattan parties, the indignity of entry-level work, and the special joy of suburban nostalgia-and to a literary voice that mixed Dorothy Parker with David Sedaris and became something all its own. Crosley still lives and works in New York City, but she's no longer the newcomer for whom a trip beyond the Upper West Side is a big adventure. She can pack up her sensibility and takes us with her to Paris, to Portugal (having picked it by spinning a globe and putting down her finger, and finally falling in with a group of Portuguese clowns), and even to Alaska, where the "bear bells" on her fellow bridesmaids' ponytails seemed silly until a grizzly cub dramatically intrudes. Meanwhile, back in New York, where new apartments beckon and taxi rides go awry, her sense of the city has become more layered, her relationships with friends and family more complicated. As always, Crosley's voice is fueled by the perfect witticism, buoyant optimism, flair for drama, and easy charm in the face of minor suffering or potential drudgery. But in How Did You Get This Number it has also become increasingly sophisticated, quicker and sharper to the point, more complex and lasting in the emotions it explores. And yet, Crosley remains the unfailingly hilarious young Everywoman, healthily equipped with intelligence and poise to fend off any potential mundanity in maturity.