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by Gerda Weissmann Klein

Author: Gerda Weissmann Klein
Subcategory: World
Language: English
Publisher: Orion Pub Co (August 31, 1997)
Pages: 272 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx azw lrf txt

Also by gerda weissmann klein. Happy in my new life, I have penned the last sentence of the past. I have written my story, with tears and with love, in the hope that my children, safely asleep in their cribs, should not awake from a nightmare and find it to be reality.

Also by gerda weissmann klein. I should like to mention with special gratitude Mr. Sloan Wilson, who saw this book in its first draft, and whose enthusiasm gave me the courage to show it to the publisher.

All But My Life is the unforgettable story of Gerda Weissmann Klein's six-year ordeal as a victim of Nazi cruelty. From her comfortable home in Bielitz (present-day Bielsko) in Poland to her miraculous survival and her liberation by American troops-including the man who was to become her husband-in Volary

All But My Life book. The artistry and vitality and heart with which Gerda Weissmann Klein brings to life her experiences as a young Polish Jewish girl during the Holocaust is nothing short of extraordinary.

All But My Life book. This is as moving and heartbreaking and life affirming as any book I’ve ever read.

All But My Life is the unforgettable story of Gerda Weissmann Klein's six-year ordeal as a victim of Nazi cruelty

All But My Life is the unforgettable story of Gerda Weissmann Klein's six-year ordeal as a victim of Nazi cruelty. From her comfortable home in Bielitz (present-day Bielsko) in Poland to her miraculous survival and her liberation by American troops-including the man who was to become her husband-in Volary, Czechoslovakia, in 1945, Gerda takes the reader on a terrifying journey. Gerda's serene and idyllic childhood is shattered when Nazis march into Poland on September 3, 1939.

Gerda Weissmann Klein (born Gerda Weissmann, May 8, 1924, Bielsko, Poland) is a Polish American writer and human rights activist. She married Kurt Klein (1920–2002) in 1946.

Gerda Weissmann Klein. THE IMPERSONAL TRAIN CREATED A welcome sense of isolation for me. Sitting in the tiny compartment I belonged to myself, my thoughts had more freedom, my dreams became keener. Sitting in the tiny compartment I belonged to myself, my thoughts had more freedom, my dreams became keener all its glory of dewy, fresh grass and budding trees. This was a setting for love, for romance, for a young, gay heart. And–I was twenty years old. We were traveling in a northerly direction. The rumor was that we were going to Grünberg, about two hundred kilometers from Landeshut

This page is operated by Gerda's manager. I just finished All but my life. I spent a day reading this. a lump in my throat that won’t go away.

This page is operated by Gerda's manager  . 1 day, so pitiful an amount of time and yet 1 day can change ones life. I read Born to survive last week. I just want to know why.

Gerda Weissmann Klein was born in Bielsko, Poland, in 1924, and now lives in Arizona with her husband, Kurt Klein, who as a . Army lieutenant liberated Weissmann on May 7, 1945. The author of five books, she has received many awards and honorary degrees and has lectured throughout the country for the past forty-five years. Kurt and Gerda are the authors of The Hours After: Letters of Love and Longing in War's Aftermath.

The story of Gerda Weissmann Klein's six-year ordeal as a victim of Nazi cruelty. It takes the reader on a terrifying journey from the author's comfortable home in the Polish town of Bielitz to her survival and liberation by American troops - one of whom was to become her husband - in Volary, Czechoslovakia, in 1945. Gerda's childhood was shattered when the Nazi's marched into Poland in 1939. Although the Weissmann's were permitted to live on for a while in the basement of their home, they were eventually separated and sent to German labour camps. Over the next few years, Gerda experienced the slow stripping away of all but her life. By the end of the war she had lost her parents, brother, home, possessions and community; even the firends she had made in the labour camps were dead. Despite her experiences, Gerda Klein conveys a strength of spirit and faith in humanity, demonstrating how hatred can be overcome.