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by Paul Bushkovitch

Author: Paul Bushkovitch
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (April 30, 1980)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr lrf lrf doc

The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce.

The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce. Bushkovitch places the merchants of Moscow within the context of Eastern Europe rather than the Western European nations against whom the merchants are usually measured.

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Bushkovitch places the merchants of Moscow within the context of Eastern Europe, a region whose economic complexities and contradictions make it a more apt standard for comparison than the Western European nations against whom the merchants are usually measured. By shifting his focus to Eastern Europe, Bushkovitch is able to re-evaluate their position in the state and other branches of the Russian economy as well as their role in international commerce.

The Merchants of Moscow, 1580-1650. Using evidence drawn from archives in Moscow, Professor Bushkovitch challenges conventional analyses of trade and industry during this period. The Merchants of Moscow examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia before the reforms of Peter the Great, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce. Antoni Maczak, "The Merchants of Moscow, 1580-1650. Paul Bushkovitch," The Journal of Modern History 53, no. 2 (Ju. 1981): 375-376. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

The merchants Bushkovitch discusses are often not from Moscow, in keeping with the fact that the book is really a deficient "history of the Russian economy as a whole" (p. 168), organized by sectors (White Sea, Baltic Sea, Poland, South, Siberia, internal market). Thus the Baltic trade and the Sol' Vychegodsk salt industry are discussed, even though Moscow merchants played little or no role in either (pp. 82-83, 135). If the "Moscow merchants" part of the title is meaningless, so are the dates 1580-1650

Book Description: The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce.

Book Description: The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce.

The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 (New York, Cambridge University Press, 1980). Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society 210, Philadelphia, 1994). Ivo Banac and Paul Bushkovitch, ed. The Nobility in Russia and East Europe, Yale Russian and East European Publications.

Автор: Bushkovitch Название: The Merchants of Moscow 1580–1650 Издательство: Cambridge Academ .

Using evidence drawn from archives in Moscow, Professor Bushkovitch challenges conventional analyses of trade and industry during this period. The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 examines the formation of the merchant class in Russia before the reforms of Peter the Great, focusing on the role of the Muscovite merchants in the establishment of foreign and domestic trade and commerce. Bushkovitch places the merchants of Moscow within the context of Eastern Europe, a region whose economic complexities and contradictions make it a more apt standard for comparison than the Western European nations against whom the merchants are usually measured. By shifting his focus to Eastern Europe, Bushkovitch is able to re-evaluate their position in the state and other branches of the Russian economy as well as their role in international commerce. Rather than presenting them as debilitated by an absolutist state whose demands depleted their time and wealth, Bushkovitch finds that the merchants of Moscow were a stable and prosperous group whose activities were central to the emerging Russian economy and whose relations with the state formed a contradictory pattern of dependence and independence.