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Download Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution djvu

by Peter Ackroyd

Author: Peter Ackroyd
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; Reprint edition (September 8, 2015)
Pages: 512 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi doc lit lrf

An extraordinary book.

An extraordinary book. Peter Ackroyd is arguably the most talented and prolific writer working in Britain today. Daily Express (UK) on Foundation. Ackroyd writes of the times and the mindset of the people. His sumptuous descriptions are rich and colorful. His books are a window of an era, masterfully and wonderfully retold, leaving the reader with an understanding that events don't just happen, but are the outcome of our own deeds. 12 people found this helpful.

Also by Peter Ackroyd. List of illustrations. He had been a successful if not a glorious monarch, managing to curb the pretensions of an argumentative clergy and of a fractious nobility

Also by Peter Ackroyd. 1. James I of England and James VI of Scotland (John de Critz the Elder, Mary Evans Picture Library). 2. Anne of Denmark, James’s spouse (. 605–10, Gheeraerts, Marcus (. 561–1635) (attr. to)), Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, UK, Bridgeman Images). He had been a successful if not a glorious monarch, managing to curb the pretensions of an argumentative clergy and of a fractious nobility. From his earliest years the restive and combative spirit of the Scottish lords ensured that, in the words of the French ambassador, he had been nourished in fear. Yet he had by guile and compromise held on to his crown.

In the early decades of the seventeenth century Jacobean tragedy, as we have seen, assumed a world without God where men and women struggle for survival.

In the early decades of the seventeenth century Jacobean tragedy, as we have seen, assumed a world without God where men and women struggle for survival e prospect of chaos only more acute. Thomas Hobbes had shown no signs of greatness

An extraordinary book.

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people.

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people. Books related to Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution. The Stuart monarchy brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king.

Rebellion - Peter Ackroyd.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 6% restored. Главная Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution.

The History of England. This is a political history of England in the 17th century. The third in a series by Peter Ackroyd. The author has an engaging style, and includes a number of vignettes on social topics and literature. I hadn't realized it was going to be all politics. There was a lot of conflict between the monarchy and the Parliament. Lots of detail on the interaction of the king at the time (or Protector . Cromwell) and the parliaments.

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people. In Rebellion, he continues his dazzling account of the history of England, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ending with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II.

The Stuart monarchy brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king. Shrewd and opinionated, James I was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft, and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country during the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I. Ackroyd offers a brilliant, warts-and-all portrayal of Charles's nemesis, Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as "that man of blood," the king he executed.

England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes's great philosophical treatise, Leviathan. In addition to its account of England's royalty, Rebellion also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty.