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by Philip Joshua Jacks

Author: Philip Joshua Jacks
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; First Edition edition (August 27, 1993)
Pages: 398 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
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Since antiquity the city of Rome has been revered both for its prestige as a center of secular and spiritual . Philip Jacks examines how the creation of the Eternal City was viewed from antiquity through the sixteenth century.

Since antiquity the city of Rome has been revered both for its prestige as a center of secular and spiritual power, as well as for its sheer longevity. Emphasising the myths and discoveries offered by Renaissance humanists from the fourteenth to sixteenth Since antiquity the city of Rome has been revered both for its prestige as a center of secular and spiritual power, as well as for its sheer longevity

Bibliographic Details Book Description: Philip Jacks examines how the creation of the Eternal City was viewed from antiquity through the sixteenth century.

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Antiquarian and the Myth of Antiquity:. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Publication Date: 1993. Since antiquity the city of Rome has been revered both for its prestige as a center of secular and spiritual power, as well as for its sheer longevity. Book Description: Philip Jacks examines how the creation of the Eternal City was viewed from antiquity through the sixteenth century.

This is not a general history of antiquarian thought during the Renaissance, nor is it a study of the work of a specific individual

This is not a general history of antiquarian thought during the Renaissance, nor is it a study of the work of a specific individual. The author takes as his focus the changing perceptions of antiquity held by scholars of the age, with particular emphasis on the construction and manipulation of images of ancient Rome. Emphasising the myths and discoveries offered by Renaissance humanists from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, he shows how their interpretations evolved over time.

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oceedings{Laureys1998PhilipJT, title {Philip Jacks, The Antiquarian and the Myth of Antiquity. The Origins of Rome in Renaissance Thought}, author {Marc Laureys}, year {1998} }. Marc Laureys.

Philip Jacks, The Antiquarian and the Myth of Antiquity: The Origins of Rome in Renaissance Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Peter Borsay, Callum Brown and Peter Burke (a1). Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921.

The Antiquarian and the Myth of Antiquity: The Origins of Rome in Renaissance Thought. G. Vossius and the Humanist Concept of History. Nicholas Wickenden, F. F. Blok, C. S. M. Rademaker, P. Tuynman. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914. Williamson Jr. et al.

Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Jacks, Philip Joshua 1954-. Rome (Italy) - History - to 476 - Historiography. Rome (Italy) - Antiquities. Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Historiography, Renaissance, Antiquities, History.

Since antiquity the city of Rome has been revered both for its prestige as a center of secular and spiritual power, as well as for its sheer longevity. Philip Jacks examines how the creation of the Eternal City was viewed from antiquity through the sixteenth century. Emphasising the myths and discoveries offered by Renaissance humanists from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, he shows how their interpretations evolved over time. With Petrarch, Boccacio, and Vergerio came the earliest efforts to confirm the historical basis of legends through studying the archaeological remains of the city. Such activity accelerated through the fifteenth century and reached a peak in the sixteenth with the discovery, in 1546, of the Fasti, and even more sensationally, the Severan plan of Rome in 1562. These fragments were to have a powerful impact on the development of modern archaeology. The antiquarians of the Renaissance not only discovered the vestiges of ancient Rome, but also actively reinterpreted the meaning of classical antiquity in the light of their own culture.