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by Brian Roberts

Author: Brian Roberts
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Hamish Hamilton Ltd (April 1984)
Pages: 320 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi lrf rtf azw

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Born to succeed; doomed to failure’. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Randolph: A Study of Churchill's Son as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Brian Roberts, a distinguished historian and biographer, is an acknowledged expert on African history. His previous books include The Zulu Kings, The Diamond Magnates, Churchills in Africa, and Cecil Rhodes and the Princess.

A member of a great patrician family, good-looking, intelligent, energetic, with great oratorical gifts and quickness of mind, the young Randolph Churchill was the Golden Boy of popular imagination and seen as a young man of destiny.

Randolph, a study of Churchill's son (1984). Cecil Rhodes, flawed Colossus (1988). Kimberley, Turbulent City. Cape Town: David Philip & Kimberley Historical Society. Obituary: Theo Aronson. The Independent, 27 May 2003.

Randolph Churchill, Sir Winston’s only son, has done well by. .

Philip Ziegler remarked that the biography of the present author by his son can presumably be expected in about twenty years.

Sarah Churchill, A Thread in the Tapestry, London, Andre Deutsch, 1967 Winston S. Jr Churchill, His Father’s Son: The life of Randolph . Brian Roberts, Randolph: a Study of Churchill ‘s Son, London, Hamilton, 1984

Sarah Churchill, A Thread in the Tapestry, London, Andre Deutsch, 1967 Winston S. Jr Churchill, His Father’s Son: The life of Randolph Churchill, London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1996. Winston S. Jr Churchill, Memories and Adventures. Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1989. Brian Roberts, Randolph: a Study of Churchill ‘s Son, London, Hamilton, 1984. Lord Rosebery, Lord Randolph Churchill, London, A. L. Humphreys (в двух томах), 1906. Alfred Leslie Rowse, The Early Churchills, London, Macmillan, 1956. Alfred Leslie Rowse, The Later Churchills, London, Macmillan, 1958.

Roberts has given us a compelling biography, but a biography of a footnote, whose fortune was often so bad that .

Roberts has given us a compelling biography, but a biography of a footnote, whose fortune was often so bad that even when he died, his demise was pushed off the front pages by Robert Kennedy's assassination. A biography of the bumptious, boisterous, boorish son of Winston S. Churchill, who spent his 57 years being a wild young man of destiny, but whose destiny was to see his dreams crash in a blend of brandy, gluttony, prejudice, and intolerance. Ever aware of his lineage, Randolph from an early age felt that it was inevitable that he should one day be Prime Minister.

‘Born to succeed; doomed to failure’. For all its cruel accuracy, this quip about Randolph Churchill is not quite fair. He was certainly born to succeed. A member of a great patrician family, good-looking, intelligent, energetic, with great oratorical gifts and quickness of mind, the young Randolph Churchill was the Golden Boy of popular imagination and seen as a young man of destiny. Grandson of the colourful late-Victorian politician Lord Randolph Churchill and son of the even more celebrated and controversial Winston Churchill, Randolph seemed set fair to continue the family tradition. His father even referred to him as 'the younger Pitt'. What went wrong? This book provides a convincing and fascinating answer. Both circumstances and his own defects of character worked against Randolph Churchill. He was spoiled by his father, his relationship with his strong-willed mother was not happy. Too much privilege sapped his initiative, he could never live up to his father's expectations and had an inability to establish close and loving relationships. His two marriages fell apart, the great love affair of his life was unrequited and, most important of all, he was handicapped by his self-willed, argumentative, bombastic and cantankerous nature. Passionately interested in politics, he fought and lost six elections; the only time he got into parliament was when he was returned unopposed. Although his wartime experiences – in the Western Desert and with the SAS in Yugoslavia – showed his courage and were probably the high water mark of his achievements, he never covered himself in the glory he so ardently sought. A talented and occasionally brilliant journalist, he did not have much success in his final career as a biographer, dying after publishing only two volumes of what was designed to be a great five-volume life of his famous father. In this shrewd analysis of Randolph's character, the author shows there was far more to him than just the self-indulgent braggart of popular legend. He was an ambitious, talented, unexpectedly sensitive man; touchingly devoted to his father, surprisingly loved by his friends and, although often offensive, never dull.