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by Richard Oram

Author: Richard Oram
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; 1 edition (February 21, 2011)
Pages: 448 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf lrf txt doc

The New Edinburgh History of Scotland, Volume 3. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011. author relates a structured history of the years 1070-1230, punctuated by the reigns of particular kings and climactic.

The New Edinburgh History of Scotland, Volume 3. Pp. 430. ISBN 978-0-7486-1497-4. Oram clearly builds on his previous works on David I. and Alexander II to craft this longer narrative of Scottish. regnal development, but he makes a point to stress the oft-. glossed multicultural vitality (Gaelic and Scandinavian). within Scotland’s story.

New Edinburgh History of Scotland. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Citation Oram R (2011) Domination and Lordship: Scotland 1070-1230. New Edinburgh History of Scotland. Abstract This volume centres upon the era conventionally labelled the 'Making of the kingdom', or the 'Anglo-Norman' era in Scottish history.

See all supported devices. This book gave me a lot of detailed information of the political and social structures of Scotland of the peirod. Similar books to Domination and Lordship: Scotland, 1070-1230 (New Edinburgh History of Scotland Book 3). Kindle Monthly Deal. Browse a new selection of discounted Kindle Books each month. Shop now. Customers who bought this item also bought. I would describe it as a very useful reference book - more for the fairly serious student of history rather than the casual reader.

Richard Oram is Professor of Medieval and Environmental History at the University of Stirling.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Richard Oram is Professor of Medieval and Environmental History at the University of Stirling. Series: New Edinburgh History of Scotland (Book 3).

Domination and Lordship book Other books in the series. New Edinburgh History of Scotland (7 books). Books by Richard Oram.

Domination and Lordship book. Start by marking Domination and Lordship: Scotland, 1070 - 1230 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Other books in the series.

Domination and Lordship : Scotland, 1070-1230. Book in the New Edinburgh History of Scotland Series). This volume centres upon the era conventionally labelled the 'Making of the kingdom', or the 'Anglo-Norman' era in Scottish history

by Edinburgh University Press. in Journal of Scottish Historical Studies.

by Edinburgh University Press. Journal of Scottish Historical Studies, Volume 33, pp 284-286; doi:10.

The New Edinburgh History of Scotland, vol. 3, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011). Oram has evidently realised that this is a way of approaching the sources for the history of the earlier medieval centuries that is not specific to the question of ‘feudalism’

The New Edinburgh History of Scotland, vol. Oram has evidently realised that this is a way of approaching the sources for the history of the earlier medieval centuries that is not specific to the question of ‘feudalism’. It is actually a general problem in all early medieval history, and Oram is equally critical of attempts to reconstruct ancient Scottish Gaelic society from a combination of medieval Irish records and early modern Lowland Scottish legal treatises, even when he himself is endeavouring to wring some usable information out of such sources.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This volume centres upon the era conventionally labelled the 'Making of the kingdom', or the 'Anglo-Norman' era in Scottish history

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This volume centres upon the era conventionally labelled the 'Making of the kingdom', or the 'Anglo-Norman' era in Scottish history. It seeks a balance between traditional historiographical concentration on the 'feudalisation' of Scottish society as part of the wholesale importation of alien cultural traditions by a 'modernising' monarchy and more recent emphasis on the continuing vitality and centrality of Gaelic culture and traditions within the twelfth- and early thirteenth-century kingdom

Domination and Lordship.

The New Edinburgh History of Scotland comprises ten textbooks exploring the development of Scotland as a political entity from earliest times to the present. Domination and Lordship.

This volume centres upon the era conventionally labelled the 'Making of the kingdom', or the 'Anglo-Norman' era in Scottish history. It seeks a balance between traditional historiographical concentration on the 'feudalisation' of Scottish society as part of the wholesale importation of alien cultural traditions by a 'modernising' monarchy and more recent emphasis on the continuing vitality and centrality of Gaelic culture and traditions within the twelfth- and early thirteenth-century kingdom.Part I explores the transition from the Gaelic kingship of Alba into the hybridised medieval state and traces Scotland's role as both dominated and dominator. It examines the redefinition of relationships with England, Gaelic magnates within Scotland's traditional territorial heartland and with autonomous/independent mainland and insular powers. These interrelationships form the central theme of an exploration of the struggle for political domination of the northern mainland of Britain and the adjacent islands, the mechanisms through which that domination was projected and expressed, and the manner of its expression.Part II is a thematic exploration of central aspects of the society and culture of late eleventh- to early thirteenth-century Scotland which gave character and substance to the emerging kingdom. It considers the evolutionary growth of Scottish economic structures, changes in the management of land-based resources, and the manner in which secular power and authority were acquired and exercised. These themes are developed in discussions of the emergence of urban communities and in the creation of a new noble class in the twelfth century. Religion is examined both in terms of the development of the Church as an institution and through the religious experience of the lay population.