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by Eleanor Clark

Author: Eleanor Clark
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: HarpPeren (June 9, 1992)
Pages: 376 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.8
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1953: National Book Award finalist nonfiction for Rome and a Villa

1953: National Book Award finalist nonfiction for Rome and a Villa. 1964: National Book Award in Arts and Letter for The Oysters of Locmariaquer. For her book The Oysters of Locmariaquer (1964), Clark received the . At reissue of Rome and the Villa, Anatole Broyard called it "perhaps the finest book ever to be written about a city.

Eleanor Clark (July 6, 1913–February 16, 1996) was born in Los Angeles and attended Vassar College in the 1930s

Eleanor Clark (July 6, 1913–February 16, 1996) was born in Los Angeles and attended Vassar College in the 1930s. She was the author of the National Book Award winner The Oysters of Locmariaquer, Rome and a Villa, Eyes, Et. and the novels The Bitter Box, Baldur's Gate, and Camping Out. She was married to Robert Penn Warren.

This item:Rome and a Villa (. Her book is lyrical but informative, and for some readers, perhaps too heavy with information, but I have found it indispensible both while in Rome and later back in the US thinking about where I had been. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Orignally published as separate articles in The New Yorker magazine, each chapter focuses on a particular subject.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. In 1947 a young american woman named Eleanor Clark went to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship to write a novel. But Rome had its way with her, the novel was abandoned, and what followed was not a novel but a series. But Rome had its way with her, the novel was abandoned, and what followed was not a novel but a series of sketches of Roman life, most written between 1948 and 1951.

Republished in a beautiful new package, the eternal classic that captures the Eternal City in all its vibrant enchantment. Bringing to life the legendary city's beauty and magic in all its many facets, Eleanor Clark's masterful collection of vignettes, Rome and a Villa, has transported readers for generations. In 1947 the young American writer traveled to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship. But instead of a novel, Clark created a series of sketches of Roman life written mostly between 1948 and 1951.

by Eleanor Clark Like Rome itself, Rome and a Villa is sensual, demanding attention, patience, and pause.

Like Rome itself, Rome and a Villa is sensual, demanding attention, patience, and pause. The only thing to do in the face of this overwhelming emotional onslaught is to give in to it, as Clark did. - New Criterion. A brilliant piece of traveler’s impressionism, written with verbal polish.

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In 1947 a young american woman named Eleanor Clark went to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship to write a novel. But Rome had its way with her, the novel was abandoned, and what followed was not a novel but a series of sketches of Roman life, most written between 1948 and 1951. This new edition of her now classic book includes an evocative foreword by the eminent translator William Weaver, who was a close friend of the author's and often wandered the city with her during the years she was working on Rome and a Villa.

Once in Rome, the foreign writer or artist, over the course of weeks, months, or years, begins to lose ambition, to lose a sense of urgency, to lose even a sense of self. What once seemed all-consuming is swallowed up by Rome&$8212;by the pace of life; by the fatalism of the Roman people, to whom everything and nothing matters; by the sheer historic weight and scale of the place. Rome is life itself—messy, random, anarchic, comical one moment, tragic the next, and above all, seductive.

Clark pays special attention to Roman art and architecture. In the book's midsection she looks at Hadrian's Villa—an enormous, unfinished palace—as a metaphor for the city itself: decaying, imperial, shabby, but capable of inducing an overwhelming dreaminess in its visitors. The book's final chapter, written for an updated edition in 1974, is a lovely portrait of the so-called Protestant cemetery where Keats, Shelley, and other foreign notables are buried.