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Download Divine Thalie: the Career Of Jeanne Quinault (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment) djvu

Download Divine Thalie: the Career Of Jeanne Quinault (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment) djvu

by Judith Curtis

Author: Judith Curtis
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Voltaire Foundation in association with Liverpool University Press (August 1, 2007)
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx mbr lrf rtf

Jeanne Quinault used her talents to shape a most unconventional life. This study offers a fresh assessment of her friendships with Caylus, Piron, Duclos, Maurepas and many other prominent individuals.

Jeanne Quinault used her talents to shape a most unconventional life. Despite her provincial origins, she was a favourite for over twenty years at the Comédie-Française and also carved an identity for herself in literary and salon life. By convention, the likely end of the career of an eighteenth-century actress was marriage, the convent or the gutter. Jeanne Quinault used her talents to shape a most unconventional life.

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During the 1730s Jeanne Quinault became close friends with Piron; she . a b Judith Curtis, "Divine Thalie": the career of Jeanne Quinault, SVEC 2007:08, pp. 10–11.

During the 1730s Jeanne Quinault became close friends with Piron; she advised him about his writing and, along with other members of her family, acted in his best play, La Métromanie (Obsession with Rhyming, 1738) In reality, Jeanne Quinault was careful to conceal her views, whatever they were, on religion and politics. Strugnell, Anthony; Foundation, Voltaire (2000). French social history: Games in the eighteenth century.

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Judith Curtis, "Divine Thalie": the career of Jeanne Quinault", SVEC 2007:08. J. A. Dainard, et a. ed. Correspondance de Mme de Graffigny, Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 1985-, in progress; 12 vols. This is the definitive work on the Quinault family, focussing on Jeanne Quinault. Françoise de Graffigny met Jeanne Quinault in 1740, and regarded the actress as her best friend for the rest of her life.

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the large quantity of critical studies and monographs. Voltaire foundation, university of oxford. Divine alie’: the career of Jeanne Quinault. and we invite you to take a fresh look! nes SVEC covers to offer modern perspectives on the eighteenth century. August 2007, ISBN 978-0-7294-0911-7.

By convention, the likely end of the career of an eighteenth-century actress was marriage, the convent or the gutter. Jeanne Quinault used her talents to shape a most unconventional life. Despite her provincial origins, she was a favourite for over twenty years at the Comédie-Française and also carved an identity for herself in literary and salon life. Jeanne Quinault's role as organizer of the société badine, called the Bout-du-Banc, is what has attracted the most interest, but historians have not generally recognized in her a salonnière as devoted to benevolence and mentorship as her wealthier and better-born contemporaries. From the time of her depiction in the pseudo-memoirs of Mme d'Épinay, the story has been distorted and errors have been handed down. This study offers a fresh assessment of her friendships with Caylus, Piron, Duclos, Maurepas and many other prominent individuals. In the theatrical sphere, Mlle Quinault promoted the development of sentimental comedy, sponsored both authors and actors, and participated in the creation of a number of works, including those of Françoise de Graffigny. Another client was Voltaire, whose letters shed light on the interplay between writers and performers. On a broader scale, the story of Jeanne Quinault is also that of the large acting family to which she belonged and of their aspiration to acceptance in polite society. Drawing on archival resources and unpublished collections of letters, this work offers readers the first detailed study of the actress and her circle.