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by V. A. C. [Vic] Gatrell

Author: V. A. C. [Vic] Gatrell
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (November 28, 1996)
Pages: 656 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
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Hanging people for small crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal Code was at its most active between 1770 and 1830. About the author (1996). V. A. C. Gatrell is University Lecturer and Fellow of Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge.

Hanging people for small crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal Code was at its most active between 1770 and 1830. Some 7,000 men and women were executed on public scaffolds then, watched by crowds of thousands. Hanging was confined to murderers thereafter, but these were still killed in public until 1868. He lives in Cambridge. Clearly the gallows loomed over much of social life in this period.

Gatrell's The Hanging Tree is a book that is often interesting and full of useful insights. Hanging people for small crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal Code was at its most active between 1770 and 1830. it is an important contribution to the history of crime and justice. -City Crowds and Criminal History. Hanging was confined to murderers thereafter, but these were still killed in public until 1868

His The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People 1770-1868 (Oxford, 1994) won the Royal Historical Society's Whitfield Prize, and was nominated as one of the historical Canon in the Times Higher Education Supplement, 2010.

His The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People 1770-1868 (Oxford, 1994) won the Royal Historical Society's Whitfield Prize, and was nominated as one of the historical Canon in the Times Higher Education Supplement, 2010.

The Hanging Tree book. With the exception of the section on the elite, Gatrell does an excellent job depicting public hangings, the changing opinions about them, and providing an explanation on why they stopped. Hanging people for small crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal.

In 1994 V. Gatrell published The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People 1770-1868. Though the book has been widely cited by historians, its complex argument about the relationship between punishment and culture has been too little understood. The work has also failed to win the wider audience it deserves among social scientists.

Gatrell was no wuss Authoritatively, over its 600 pages, The Hanging Tree swung between narrative and theory, breaking taboos no. .

He explored the psychology of the crowd, the hangman and the hanged (juxtaposing "Making a day of it" and "Dying bravely" as chapter subtitles). Authoritatively, over its 600 pages, The Hanging Tree swung between narrative and theory, breaking taboos not only of content but also form. He set Hogarth's image of the woman orange-seller at Tyburn alongside a critical reading of the "last dying speech" hawked by the orange-seller's peddler companion, evidence that refracted state repression but also charivari

Gatrell, Vic (1996), The Hanging Tree. Sharpe, James A. (1985), Last dying speeches: religion, ideology and public execution in seventeenth-century England, Past & Present, 107, pp. 144-167

Gatrell, Vic (1996), The Hanging Tree. Execution and the English People, 1770-1868, Oxford University Press. Gogniat, Emmanuel (2004), Avouer au seuil du gibet. Enjeu social et judiciaire du testament de mort d’un brigand pendu à Genève en 1787, Crime, Histoire et Sociétés, nº 8, pp. 63-84. 144-167. TERM Fall '16. TAGS History, The American, Verdad, España, Barcelona, Pena de muerte.

The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People 1770-1868 Hanging people for petty crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal Code was at its most active between 1770 and 1830. Some 7,000 men and women were executed on public scaffolds, watched by crowds of thousands. In this learned and deeply impassioned work, Gatrell surveys the development of executions in England from the days of the "bloody code" in the late 18th and early 19th centuries-when people were executed for petty theft-through the legal reforms that made murder essentially the only crime punishable by death and finally to the abolition of execution as a public.

The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People, 1770-1868, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1994. A professor of history in England, . Gatrell has written books dealing with the history of crime and punishment, sexual politics, and changing social and cultural manners. As Vic Gatrell) City of Laughter: Sex and Satire in Eighteenth-century London, Atlantic (London, England), 2006. Contributor of articles to numerous professional journals. With The Hanging Tree: Execution and the English People, 1770-1868, he provides a cultural study of the experiences, meanings of, and attitudes toward public execution.

Hanging people for petty crimes as well as grave, the Bloody Penal Code was at its most active between 1770 and 1830. Some 7,000 men and women were executed on public scaffolds, watched by crowds of thousands. This acclaimed study is the first to explore what a wide range of people felt about these ceremonies. Gatrell draws on letters, diaries, ballads, broadsides, and images, as well as on poignant appeals for mercy which, until now, have been largely neglected by historians. Panoramic in range, scholarly in method, and compelling in style and in argument, this is one of those rare histories which both shift our sense of the past and speak powerfully to the present.