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by Jongsuk Chay

Author: Jongsuk Chay
Subcategory: Asia
Language: English
Publisher: Praeger (March 30, 2002)
Pages: 336 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lrf docx mobi

The United States and the Republic of Korea have managed to forge a strong working relationship both in wartime and in peacetime, despite an inequality in power between them, through fulfillment of their respective responsibilities. Chay explores how Korean and American actions and inaction affected relations between the two and within the international context of the Korean War. He focuses on how and why war might have been avoided or resolved differently as a result of poor choices and missed opportunities.

Home Browse Books Book details, Unequal Partners in Peace and . Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Home Browse Books Book details, Unequal Partners in Peace and War: The Republic. Unequal Partners in Peace and War: The Republic of Korea and the United States, 1948-1953. The United States and the Republic of Korea have managed to forge a strong working relationship both in wartime and in peacetime, despite an inequality in power between them, through fulfillment of their respective responsibilities.

The United States and the Republic of Korea have managed to forge a strong working relationship both in wartime and in peacetime, despite an inequality in power between them, through fulfillment of their respective responsibilities.

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From April–May 1882, the United States, represented by Commodore Robert W. Shufeldt of the United States Navy, and Korea negotiated and . Chay, Jongsuk (2002). Unequal Partners in Peace and War: The Republic of Korea and the United States, 1948–1953.

From April–May 1882, the United States, represented by Commodore Robert W. Shufeldt of the United States Navy, and Korea negotiated and approved a 14-article treaty  . p. 10. ISBN 0-275-97125-2.

Canonical Url: ww. avoisier. Shufeldt of the United States Navy, and Korea . ISBN 0275971252. Shufeldt of the United States Navy, and Korea negotiated and approved a 14-article treaty The treaty remained in effect until the annexation of Korea in 1910.

The United States and the Republic of Korea have managed to forge a strong working relationship both in wartime and in peacetime, despite an inequality in power between them, through fulfillment of their respective responsibilities. Chay explores how Korean and American actions and inaction affected relations between the two and within the international context of the Korean War. He focuses on how and why war might have been avoided or resolved differently as a result of poor choices and missed opportunities. Using Korean sources, as well as Chinese and Russian materials, this study provides valuable new insights into the relationship between these two unequal powers.

The course of the Korean War swung like a pendulum powered by two outside interventions: that of the United States, made largely due to the symbolic value of Korea; and that of China, an action taken mainly for security reasons. Chay identifies key actions, including the division of Korea along the 38th Parallel, the 1949 troop withdrawal, and the failure to build an adequate military and economic deterrent in the South, as events that, had they not occurred, might have influenced the final outcome of the conflict. Restraint on the part of the United States and China and the role of the Korean peninsula as a geographic buffer zone ultimately prevented either side from gaining control of the entire peninsula, resulting in a stalemate. While issues of relative strength and weakness hindered U.S.-Korean cooperation after the end of the Second World War, once war came to the region the two powers built a successful partnership that addressed the national interests of both parties.