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by Billie Jean Collins,Mary R. Bachvarova,Ian C. Rutherford

Author: Billie Jean Collins,Mary R. Bachvarova,Ian C. Rutherford
Subcategory: Ancient Civilizations
Language: English
Publisher: Oxbow Books (November 28, 2008)
Pages: 216 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
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by Billie Jean Collins (Author), Mary R. Bachvarova (Author), Ian Rutherford (Author) & 0 more. This book offers many windows on, and many paths into, the world of Hittites, Greeks, and their neighbors.

by Billie Jean Collins (Author), Mary R. It will doubtless be of interest to all classicists, as to all scholars concerned with Anatolia and the ancient Near East, and should be a required addition to any academic library concerned with the ancient world.

Billie Jean Collins, Mary R. Bachvarova and Ian C. Rutherford. Bergquist 1993 on animal sacrifice), and that usage is justifiable as long as it is taken to imply not that the different cultures are the same, but rather that they have a number of key features.

Anatolian Interfaces book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Anatolian Interfaces: Hittites, Greeks and their Neighbours as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Bachvarova, Ian Rutherford. The papers in this collection are the product of the conference "Hittites, Greeks and Their Neighbors in Ancient Anatolia: An International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction,". The papers in this collection are the product of the conference "Hittites, Greeks and Their Neighbors in Ancient Anatolia: An International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction," hosted by Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Mary Bachvarova) Hittite Ethnicity? Constructions of Identity in Hittite Literature (Amir Gilan) Part 4: Identity and .

This book offers many windows on, and many paths into, the world of Hittites, Greeks, and their neighbors.

Proceedings of an International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction, September 17–19, 2004, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2008. Article in The Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:213-214 · November 2010 with 7 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Bachvarova, & Ian C. Rutherford, eds. Anatolian Interfaces: Hittites, Greeks and their Neighbours. London: Oxbow Books, 2008. H. Craig Melchert, ed. The Luwians. Leiden: Brill, 2003, ISBN 90-04-13009-8. also in: Die Hethiter und ihr Reich.

Collins, Billie Jean, Mary R. Bachvarova, and Ian Rutherford. Anatolian Interfaces: Hittites, Greeks, and Their Neighbours: Proceedings of an International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction, September 17-19, 2004, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Oxford, England: Oxbow Books, 2008. Diakonoff, I. M. Women in Old Babylonia not under Patriarchal Authority.

The papers in this collection are the product of the conference "Hittites, Greeks and Their Neighbors in Ancient Anatolia: An International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction," hosted by Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. They cover an impressive range of issues relating to the complex cultural interactions that took place on Anatolian soil over the course of two millennia, in the process highlighting the difficulties inherent in studying societies that are multi-cultural in their make-up and outlook, as well as the role that cultural identity played in shaping those interactions. Topics include possible sources of tension along the Mycenaean-Anatolian interface; the transmission of mythological and religious elements between cultures; the change across time and space in literary motifs as they are adapted to new milieus and new audiences; the ways in which linguistic data can refine our understanding of the interrelations between the various peoples who lived in Anatolia; and the role that the Anatolian kingdoms of the first millennium played as cultural filters and conduits through which North Syrian or Near Eastern ideas or materials were transmitted to the Greeks.