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Download A Place Called Grand Canyon: Contested Geographies (Society, Environment, and Place) djvu

Download A Place Called Grand Canyon: Contested Geographies (Society, Environment, and Place) djvu

by Barbara J. Morehouse

Author: Barbara J. Morehouse
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of Arizona Press; 1st edition (February 1, 1996)
Pages: 202 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lrf doc lrf

A Place Called Grand Canyon book.

A Place Called Grand Canyon book.

A Place Called Grand Canyon: Contested Geographies (Society, Environment, and Place). Many of the places referenced are easily seen from the rims. the South Rim is almost unchanged as far as the older hotels are concerned. Barbara J. Morehouse. How the Canyon Became Grand: A Short History. This book was recommended by a Park Ranger during our visit. Some of the photos are too small to be of any value.

Imagine the Grand Canyon with no people

Imagine the Grand Canyon with no people. Just the psychedelic-colored canyon walls, the wind, and the river silent and milk chocolaty at the bottom of the gorge. That’s how it must have looked to the Native Americans who lived in and around the Grand Canyon 12,000 years ago, and to the Spanish explorers who laid eyes on the rift in the 16th century. Fast forward to today, when more than 6 million people a year visit Grand Canyon National Park to experience its visitor centers, mule trips, train tour, helicopter rides, and more

For most people, "Grand Canyon" signifies that place of scenic wonder identified with Grand Canyon National Park.

For most people, "Grand Canyon" signifies that place of scenic wonder identified with Grand Canyon National Park. Beyond the boundaries of the park, however, extends the greater Grand Canyon, a region that includes five Indian reservations, numerous human settlements, and lands managed by three federal agencies and by the states of Arizona and Utah.

Human activities are impacting the Grand Canyon in unexpected ways from its toxic past to tourism. On January 11, 1908, . President Theodore Roosevelt made the massive Grand Canyon in northwestern Arizona a national monument, declaring You cannot improve upon it. View Historic Article. Download and print this coloring page of a famous United States landmark.

Morehouse BJ (1996) A place called Grand Canyon: contested geographies. University of Arizona Press, TucsonGoogle Scholar. Morgan LH (1881) Houses and house-life of the American Aborigines. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar. Muenchrath DA, Salvador RJ (1995) Maize productivity and agroecology: effects of environment and agricultural practices on the biology of maize. In: Toll HW (ed) Soil, water, biology, and belief in prehistoric and traditional southwestern agriculture, Spec Pub No. 2. New Mexico Archaeological Council, Albuquerque, pp 303–333Google Scholar.

Author: Morehouse, Barbara . An unprecedented survey of how the lands and resources of the greater Grand Canyon have come to be divided in many different ways and for many different reasons.

Availability: In stock. University of Arizona Press, 1996. How do you rate this product? 1 star.

Morehouse, Barbara J. 1996. A Place Called Grand Canyon: Contested Geographies. Blowout: A Case Study of the Santa Barbara Oil Spill. Proceedings of the 2009 George Wright Society Biennial Conference on Parks, Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites, pp. 111–116. National Park Service. North Scituate, Mass. Tiron, R. (2006a, 28 June). George Wright Society. Legislative Entrepreneurship in the . House of Representatives. Wilkinson, J. Vail, N. Woolley, M. and Vail, A. .Warranty Deed to Santa Rosa Island.

For most people, "Grand Canyon" signifies that place of scenic wonder identified with Grand Canyon National Park. Beyond the boundaries of the park, however, extends the greater Grand Canyon, a region that includes five Indian reservations, numerous human settlements, and lands managed by three federal agencies and by the states of Arizona and Utah. Many people have sought to etch their values, economic practices, and physical presence on this vast expanse. Ultimately, all have had to come to terms with the limits imposed by the physical environment and the constraints posed by others seeking to carve out a place for themselves. A Place Called Grand Canyon is an unprecedented survey of how the lands and resources of the greater Grand Canyon have come to be divided in many different ways and for many different reasons. It chronicles the ebb and flow of power --changes in who controls the land and gives it meaning. The book begins with an exploration of the geographies of the native peoples, then examines how the westward expansion of the United States affected their lives and lands. It traces the century of contest and negotiation over the land and its resources that began in the 1880s and concludes with an assessment of contemporary efforts to redefine the region. Along the way, it explores how the spaces of the greater Grand Canyon area came to be defined and used, and how those spaces in turn influenced later contests among the ranchers, loggers, miners, recreationists, preservationists, Native Americans, and others claiming a piece--or all--of the area for their own ends. The story exposes how dynamic the geographical boundaries of the region really are, regardless of the indelibility of the ink with which they were drawn. With visitation to Grand Canyon National Park approaching five million people per year, pressures on resources are intensifying. When the greater Grand Canyon area is considered, environmental management is further complicated by the often-conflicting demands of business, recreation, ecological preservation, and human settlement. Morehouse invites us to look beyond boundaries drawn on maps to discover what Grand Canyon means to different people, and to think more deeply about what living in harmony with the land really entails. Her insights will be of interest to geographers and other social scientists--including anthropologists and environmental historians--and to all who seek a counterpoint to conventional natural histories of the region.