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Download Clash at Kennesaw: June and July 1864 djvu

Download Clash at Kennesaw: June and July 1864 djvu

by Russell Blount Jr.

Author: Russell Blount Jr.
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Pelican Publishing (September 10, 2012)
Pages: 160 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr rtf mbr docx

Clash at Kennesaw book. Start by marking Clash at Kennesaw: June and July 1864 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Clash at Kennesaw book. Gain perspective on the Atlanta Campaign's dramatic month-long battle  .

In the summer of 1864, Union and Confederate armies fought and suffered in North Georgia, struggling for possession of Kennesaw Mountain.

From early June to mid-July of 1864, North Georgia's Kennesaw Mountain loomed as the focal point around which the Union and Confederate armies fought and suffered

From early June to mid-July of 1864, North Georgia's Kennesaw Mountain loomed as the focal point around which the Union and Confederate armies fought and suffered. This dramatic tale covers one of the Civil War's most gruesome battles, offering insight into the strategic turning point in Sherman's battle for Atlanta. From the Georgia rail towns of Acworth to Big Shanty (now Kennesaw) and Marietta, this book covers the Atlanta Campaign's deadly, month-long struggle over possession of Kennesaw Mountain.

Russell W. Blount, Jr. is a Civil War enthusiast who taught American history at the high-school level. He received a BS in history from the University of South Alabama, and his affinity for history is apparent in his involvement with such organizations as the Civil War Preservation Trust, Sons of Confederate Veterans, and the Historic Mobile Preservation Society. Blount is also the author of Pelican's The Battles of New Hope Church. He resides in Mobile, Alabama, with his wife.

Russell Blount's "Clash at Kennesaw: June and July 1864," published in June of 2012 isn't tremendous either

Russell Blount's "Clash at Kennesaw: June and July 1864," published in June of 2012 isn't tremendous either. Although not as poor as his first book published in 2010 covering the fighting along the Dallas-New Hope line, it suffers from an almost complete lack of manuscript material, a heavy reliance upon previous authors (especially Castel) and most fatally from a very simplistic presentation of the subject matter

Kennesaw Mountain tells the story of an important phase of the Atlanta campaign. A final section explores the Confederate earthworks preserved within the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

Kennesaw Mountain tells the story of an important phase of the Atlanta campaign. Historian Earl J. Hess explains how this battle, with its combination of maneuver and combat, severely tried the patience and endurance of the common soldier and why Johnston's strategy might have been the Confederates' best chance to halt the Federal drive toward Atlanta. He gives special attention to the engagement at Kolb's Farm on June 22 and Sherman's assault on June 27. A final section explores the Confederate earthworks preserved within the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

Kennedy clashed again with Khrushchev in October 1962 during the Cuban missile crisis.

Kennedy clashed again with Khrushchev in October 1962 during the Cuban missile crisis. After learning that the Soviet Union was constructing a number of nuclear and long-range missile sites in Cuba that could pose a threat to the continental United States, Kennedy announced a naval blockade of Cuba. The tense standoff lasted nearly two weeks before Khrushchev agreed to dismantle Soviet missile sites in Cuba in return for America’s promise not to invade the island and the removal of .

Gain perspective on the Atlanta Campaign's dramatic month-long battle. In the summer of 1864, Union and Confederate armies fought and suffered in North Georgia, struggling for possession of Kennesaw Mountain. This book tells the tale of this important phase of the Atlanta Campaign during the Civil War. Included are insights into the character of commanders William T. Sherman and Joseph E. Johnston and the common privates, along with civilian accounts.