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by Kandace D. Hollenbach

Author: Kandace D. Hollenbach
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University Alabama Press; First edition (April 19, 2009)
Pages: 312 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf doc mbr azw

In Foraging, Hollenbach analyzes and compares botanical remains from archaeological excavations in four rockshelters in the Middle Tennessee River Valley.

In Foraging, Hollenbach analyzes and compares botanical remains from archaeological excavations in four rockshelters in the Middle Tennessee River Valley. The artifact assemblages of rockshelter and open-air sites are similar, so it is reasonable to assume that faunal and botanical assemblages would be similar, if open-air sites had comparable preservation of organic remains.

Kandace D. Hollenbach. Download PDF book format. Personal Name: Hollenbach, Kandace D. Varying Form of Title: Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, twelve thousand five hundred to eight thousand years ago. Publication, Distribution, et. Tuscaloosa

Kandace D. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 years ago Kandace D. Book's title: Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 years ago Kandace D. Library of Congress Control Number: 2008035775. Tuscaloosa. University of Alabama Press, (c)2009.

Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley 12,500 to 8,000 Years Ago more. by Kandace Hollenbach. More Info: University of Alabama Press. As Archaic-period groups began to occupy river valleys more intensively, in part due to changing climatic patterns during the mid-Holocene that created more stable river systems, their activities created disturbed areas in which these weedy plants thrive.

Discover more publications, questions and projects in Tennessee. group burials of 4 or 5. Cheryl Claassen. This project is part of a larger effort at demonstration that there was a hunt god rite established by 8000 years ago in the Mississippi valley with its greatest shrine during the Archaic being Ind ian Knoll.

by Kandace D. Publication Date: 4/19/2009. ISBN 13: 9780817355227. Help your friends save money on textbooks! Store. Plants are inarguably a significant component of the diets of foraging peoples in non-arctic environments. As such, the decisions and activities associated with the gathering and exploitation of plants are important to foragers' subsistence pursuits.

Plants are inarguably a significant component of the diets of foraging peoples in non-arctic environments. As such, the decisions and activities associated with the gathering and exploitation of plants are important to foragers' subsistence pursuits Full description.

Originally excavated in 1973, Widows Creek (1JA305) is a deeply stratified, multi-component site located on the Tennessee River in Jackson County . Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 Years Ago. Kandace D.

Originally excavated in 1973, Widows Creek (1JA305) is a deeply stratified, multi-component site located on the Tennessee River in Jackson County, Alabama, with cultural deposits spanning the Earl. More). 2. View via Publisher. As such, the decisions and activities associated with the gathering and exploitation o.

12,500 to 8,000 Years Ag. In Foraging, Hollenbach analyzes and compares botanical remains from archaeological excavations in four rockshelters in the Middle Tennessee River Valley.

Plants are inarguably a significant component of the diets of foraging peoples in non-arctic environments. As such, the decisions and activities associated with the gathering and exploitation of plants are important to foragers’ subsistence pursuits. Plant remains are particularly important for understanding gathering activities. Inasmuch as plant foods comprised a considerable portion of early foragers’ diets, and the gathering and processing of these plant resources occupied a significant proportion of the population, namely women, children, and the elderly, an understanding of gathering activities and how they relate to use of the landscape is critical. Organic remains are poorly preserved in the acidic soils of the Southeast and are often limited or absent from open-air sites, but archaeological deposits protected within rockshelters provide an exception. Organic remains are consistently well preserved in their rain-protected deposits, and rockshelters are locations that groups repeatedly visited. Because of this repeated use and remarkable preservation, significant quantities of well-preserved faunal and botanical remains can be recovered from rockshelter deposits.  In Foraging, Hollenbach analyzes and compares botanical remains from archaeological excavations in four rockshelters in the Middle Tennessee River Valley. The artifact assemblages of rockshelter and open-air sites are similar, so it is reasonable to assume that faunal and botanical assemblages would be similar, if open-air sites had comparable preservation of organic remains. The rich organic data recovered from rockshelters therefore may be considered representative of general subsistence and settlement strategies, and can significantly inform our views of lifeways of Late Paleoindian and Early Archaic peoples. The data produced from this analysis provides a valuable baseline of plant food use by early foragers in the region, and establishes a model of Late Paleoindian and Early Archaic lifeways in the Southeast.