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by Lina Sattamini,James N. Green,Rex P. Nielson

Author: Lina Sattamini,James N. Green,Rex P. Nielson
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (June 9, 2010)
Pages: 208 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf lit rtf mobi

Start by marking A Mother's Cry: A Memoir of Politics, Prison, and Torture under the Brazilian Military Dictatorship as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book is a memorable and highly readable human story and source that has gained a new relevancy since its publication. - Philip Evanson The Americas "A Mother's Cry should rank among the foremost publications of the testimonial genre and is suitable for a broad, interdisciplinary audience interested in human rights, resistance, and social justice.

Marcos’s mother, Lina Penna Sattamini, was living in the United States . First published in Brazil in 2000, A Mother’s Cry is testimonial literature at its best.

Marcos’s mother, Lina Penna Sattamini, was living in the United States and working for the . State Department when her son was captured. After learning of his arrest, she and her family mobilized every resource and contact to discover where he was being held, and then they launched an equally intense effort to have him released. Marcos was freed from prison in 1971. Lina Penna Sattamini wrote her memoir as a protest against historical amnesia. It conveys the experiences of a family united by love and determination during years of political repression.

Marcos’s mother, Lina Penna Sattamini, was living in the United States and . Lina Penna Sattamini describes her son’s tribulations through letters exchanged among family members, including Marcos, during the year that he was imprisoned. James N. Green’s introduction provides an overview of the political situation in Brazil, and Latin America more broadly, during that tumultuous era.

a young political activist, was seized in S o Paulo, imprisoned, and tortured.

A Mother's Cry : A Memoir of Politics, Prison, and Torture under the Brazilian Military Dictatorship. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Brazil's dictatorship arrested, tortured, and interrogated many people it suspected of subversion; hundreds of those arrested were killed in prison. In May 1970, Marcos P. S. Arruda, a young political activist, was seized in S o Paulo, imprisoned, and tortured. A Mother's Cry is the harrowing story of Marcos's incarceration and his family's efforts to locate him and obtain his release.

Lina Penna Sattamini is a Brazilian interpreter and mother who was living and working in the United States in the 1960s when her son was kidnapped and tortured by members of Brazil’s military regime. Sattamini and her family fought passionately and fiercely to have her son released from prison. In Brazil in 2000, she published A Mother’s Cry, a memoir of her family’s struggle. The book was translated and published in the United States in 2010.

A Mother’s Cry is the story of a Brazilian mother who, while living in the United States in the 1960s, learns by mail of her son’s kidnapping by agents of Brazil’s military regime

A Mother’s Cry is the story of a Brazilian mother who, while living in the United States in the 1960s, learns by mail of her son’s kidnapping by agents of Brazil’s military regime. Without immediate means to locate her son, there is ‘only’ his grandmother in Brazil to initially confront the dictatorship’s atrocity establishment. The stuff of a great film, A Mother’s Cry juxtaposes their efforts to secure the young man’s release with his strategies for surviving brutalizing physical and potentially spirit-breaking torture.

Lina Sattamini, James N. Green, Rex P. Nielson. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Brazil’s dictatorship arrested, tortured, and interrogated many people it suspected of subversion; hundreds of those arrested were killed in prison. Arruda, a young political activist, was seized in São Paulo, imprisoned, and tortured. A Mother’s Cry is the harrowing story of Marcos’s incarceration and his family’s efforts to locate him and obtain his release. Marcos’s mother, Lina Penna Sattamini, was living in the United States and working for the .

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A Mother’s Cry: A Memoir of Politics, Prison, and Torture under the Brazilian Military Dictatorship by Lina Penna Sattamini, translated by Rex P. Nielson and James N. Green, with introduction by James N. Green. Durham: Duke University Press, 2010. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Brazil’s dictatorship arrested, tortured, and interrogated many people it suspected of subversion; hundreds of those arrested were killed in prison. In May 1970, Marcos P. S. Arruda, a young political activist, was seized in São Paulo, imprisoned, and tortured. A Mother’s Cry is the harrowing story of Marcos’s incarceration and his family’s efforts to locate him and obtain his release. Marcos’s mother, Lina Penna Sattamini, was living in the United States and working for the U.S. State Department when her son was captured. After learning of his arrest, she and her family mobilized every resource and contact to discover where he was being held, and then they launched an equally intense effort to have him released. Marcos was freed from prison in 1971. Fearing that he would be arrested and tortured again, he left the country, beginning eight years of exile.

Lina Penna Sattamini describes her son’s tribulations through letters exchanged among family members, including Marcos, during the year that he was imprisoned. Her narrative is enhanced by Marcos’s account of his arrest, imprisonment, and torture. James N. Green’s introduction provides an overview of the political situation in Brazil, and Latin America more broadly, during that tumultuous era. In the 1990s, some Brazilians began to suggest that it would be best to forget the trauma of that era and move on. Lina Penna Sattamini wrote her memoir as a protest against historical amnesia. First published in Brazil in 2000, A Mother’s Cry is testimonial literature at its best. It conveys the experiences of a family united by love and determination during years of political repression.