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by Loren Schweninger,John Hope Franklin

Author: Loren Schweninger,John Hope Franklin
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Trade edition edition (September 1, 2005)
Pages: 304 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf azw txt mobi

Promised Land does indeed cover an interesting family. This is a moving, enlightening history of one African-American family in the pre-War South

Promised Land does indeed cover an interesting family. The true tales of the Thomas clan, descendents of a "semi-free" entrepreneuring slave in y Nashville, have the potential to enlarge the boundaries of our imagination of American history. The telling is another matter: far less imaginative. Much of what one learns in Promised Land one could get more amusingly and emotionally wrenchingly from Edward Jones's The Known World. This is a moving, enlightening history of one African-American family in the pre-War South. The strength, anguish, resourcefulness, and bravery of the enslaved are highlights of their story.

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger weave a compelling narrative that illuminates the larger themes of slavery and freedom. To a remarkable degree, this small family experienced the full gamut of slavery, witnessing everything from the breakup of slave families, brutal punishment, and runaways, to miscegenation, insurrection panics, and slave patrols. They also illuminate the hidden lives of '' virtually free'' slaves, who maintained close relationships with whites, maneuvered within the system, and gained a large measure of autonomy.

0195160886 (ISBN13: 9780195160888). Here the authors narrate more than just a story of a slave family living in America’s antebellum south, but grant us a truer lens through which to see a world that only exists for many of us upon the words of pages inside books.

by John Hope Franklin. Book Overview Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The matriarch of a remarkable African American family, Sally Thomas went from being a slave on a tobacco plantation to a "virtually free" slave who ran her own business and purchased one of her sons out of bondage. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

The book told the story of three generations of slaves in the 1800s and their respective experiences in the antebellum United States.

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger talked about their book, published by Oxfor. The book told the story of three generations of slaves in the 1800s and their respective experiences in the antebellum United States. The authors also explored the ways in which these former slaves settled in northern California, Canada, and New England.

John Hope Franklin, Loren Schweninger. Narrative is the champion of the unpredictable and the ironic; but Oxfords New Narratives in American History is dedicated to more than stories that are diverting curiosities

John Hope Franklin, Loren Schweninger. Narrative is the champion of the unpredictable and the ironic; but Oxfords New Narratives in American History is dedicated to more than stories that are diverting curiosities. Our series aims to produce narratives that engage readers and serve as lenses into the most illuminating scholarship of our generation.

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger explore a black family's quest for freedom and economic .

John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger explore a black family's quest for freedom and economic security during the decades immediately preceding the Civil Wa. Quasi-free slaves were artisans or skilled workers who were allowed to live independently of their masters, hire themselves out, and retain a significant portion of their earnings for themselves.

By Loren Schweninger, John Hope Franklin. On the other hand, the best history uncovers subjects that are simply beyond invention. the family from the antebellum South portrayed here by historians John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger breaks nearly all the traditional stereotypes associated with such rational constructs as black/white and slave/free. The matriarch of a remarkable African American family, Sally Thomas went from being a slave on a tobacco plantation, to a "virtually free" slave who ran her own business and purchased one of her sons out of bondage.

The matriarch of a remarkable African American family, Sally Thomas went from being a slave on a tobacco plantation, to a "virtually free" slave who ran her own business and purchased one of her sons out of bondage. In Search of the Promised Land offers a vivid portrait of the extended Thomas-Rapier family and of the life of slaves before the Civil War. Based on family letters as well as an autobiography by one of Thomas' sons, this remarkable piece of detective work follows a singular group as they walk the boundary between slave and free, traveling across the country in search of a "promised land" where African Americans would be treated with respect. Their record of these journeys provides a vivid picture of antebellum America, stretching from New Orleans to St. Louis, from the Overland Trail to the California Gold Rush, and from Civil War battles to steamboat adventures. John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger weave a compelling narrative that illuminates the larger themes of slavery and freedom. To a remarkable degree, this small family experienced the full gamut of slavery, witnessing everything from the breakup of slave families, brutal punishment, and runaways, to miscegenation, insurrection panics, and slave patrols. They also illuminate the hidden lives of " virtually free" slaves, who maintained close relationships with whites, maneuvered within the system, and gained a large measure of autonomy. The Thomas-Rapiers were keen observers of the human condition. Through the eyes of this exceptional family and the indomitable black woman who held them together, we witness aspects of human bondage otherwise hidden from view.