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Download The Right To Fight: A History Of African Americans In The Military djvu

by Gerald Astor

Author: Gerald Astor
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Da Capo Press; First Edition edition (April 24, 2001)
Pages: 576 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw rtf lrf txt

Gerald Astor is a prominent military historian and author whose previous books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide .

Gerald Astor is a prominent military historian and author whose previous books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide, The Greatest War, and The Mighty Eighth. He lives near New York City.

The Right to Fight book. Although African Americans have always fought and died in defense of their country, even before there was a United States of America, it has always been an uphill struggle for them to partake of this fundamental obligation of citizenship. Despite hundreds of years of evidence to the contrary.

Although African Americans have always fought and died in defense of their country, even before there was a. .

Although African Americans have always fought and died in defense of their country, even before there was a United States of America, it has always been an uphill struggle for them to partake of this fundamental obligation of citizenship. Gerald Astor is a critically acclaimed military historian and author of such books as "The Mighty Eighth,"" A Blood Dimmed Tide,"" The Right to Fight,"" The Greatest War," and" Bloody" "Forest," He lives near New York City.

He collaborated with Anthony Villano, a former . agent who recruited informants from the Mafia, in Brick Agent. In addition to his son, of Ardsley, .

The Right to Fight is an overview of two centuries of African American military history and is the first to bring the information together into one book. The book also corrects errors of fact and interpretation in earlier histories of narrower scope

The Right to Fight is an overview of two centuries of African American military history and is the first to bring the information together into one book. The book also corrects errors of fact and interpretation in earlier histories of narrower scope. It incorporates memoirs, oral histories and interviews, including 60 the author conducted specifically for the book.

An all-encompassing chronicle of African-Americans' struggles to serve in the armed forces of the US, by.Astor's work is aptly titled, considering, as it does, the struggle that African-Americans have had to wage to fight for a society that mistrusted their courage under fire.

An all-encompassing chronicle of African-Americans' struggles to serve in the armed forces of the US, by popular military historian Astor (The Mighty Eighth, 1997, etc).

From the birth of the United States, African American men and women have fought and died in defense of a nation that has often denied them many fundamental rights of citizenship. Now Gerald Astor has chronicled their efforts and accomplishments in this critically acclaimed survey.

A large contingent of African Americans served in the American Civil War. 186,097 black men joined the Union Army: 7,122 officers, and 178,975 enlisted soldiers. 12 Approximately 20,000 black sailors served in the Union Navy and formed a large percentage of many ships' crews. Later in the War, many regiments were recruited and organized as the United States Colored Troops, which reinforced the Northern side substantially in the last two years.

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil .

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil rights movement or the freedom movement-went forward in the 1940s and ’50s in persistent and deliberate steps. In the courts the NAACP successfully attacked restrictive covenants in housing, segregation in interstate transportation, and discrimination in public recreational facilities. White citizens’ councils in the South fought back with legal maneuvers, economic pressure, and even violence. Direct nonviolent action by African Americans achieved its first major success in the Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott of 1955–56, led by the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Military history of African Americans.

From the birth of the United States, African American men and women have fought and died in defense of a nation that has often denied them many fundamental rights of citizenship. Now Gerald Astor has chronicled their efforts and accomplishments in this critically acclaimed survey. From Crispus Attucks, the first casualty of the American Revolution, to fighters on both sides of the Civil War, Astor moves to the postwar Indian campaigns and the infamous Brownsville riot. He also documents the prejudices and grievous wrongs that have kept African Americans from service—and finally traces their ascent to the highest levels. The Right to Fight is a groundbreaking contribution to American history.