» » Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation
Download Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation djvu

Download Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation djvu

by Jan Noel

Author: Jan Noel
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of Toronto Press; 1 edition (April 19, 1995)
Pages: 311 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt lrf docx rtf

The Temperance movement has played a large part in the history of Canada.

The Temperance movement has played a large part in the history of Canada. This overview by Jan Noel is the first major study of the subject since 1919. Noel's study is social history examining the forces that created the temperance movement and the effect of the movement on work, women, children, religion, and social structure. eISBN: 978-1-4875-7856-5. Subjects: History, Sociology.

Noel perceives the call for temperance as a hybrid of idealism and material concerns. She assesses the interplay of these concerns in the regions of British North America where the movement showed strength before Confederation: the Atlantic colonies of Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island; the province of Canada (the southern areas of today's Quebec and Ontario); and the Red River colony. It eliminated the acceptance of drink in the workplace and reduced the amount of alcohol consumed. It throve best and longest where improved communications and a middle class grew

Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.

Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. In Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation, the author examines the social composition, motives, and success of the campaigns against alcoholic drink in the British North American provinces between 1820 and 1870. Noel rejects older arguments that temperance was simply a form of social control imposed by Protestant middle classes on recalcitrant workers, immigrants, and Catholics

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades Before Confederation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Special Issue on Housing. Noel, Jan. Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades Before Confederation. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995.

Jan Noel, Peter Long, Donald Smith, Frank A. Dieterman, Michael Puddister, Roger E. Riendeau, Ronald Williamson, James Bendell, David Smith. Along a River: The First French-Canadian Women.

Canada dry. temperance crusades before Confederation. Published in Toronto. Temperance, History, Canada, Tempérance, Histoire.

Her book Canada Dry, Temperance Crusades before Confederation won the Canadian Historical Association’s John A. Macdon-ald Prize in 1996. Nuns in New France figure prominently in her forthcom-ing book, Women of an Ancien Régime Colony. P. Wallace Platt is a Basilian priest, born in Toronto in 1925 and ordained to the priesthood in 1950. degrees from the University of Toronto and a Licence ès Lettres from the Université de Lyon. He has taught in Canada, the United States, France, and Colombia. His biography of Cardinal Flahiff, Gentle Eminence (McGill-Queen’s University.

Her earlier work, Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation, received the Canadian Historical Association’s Macdonald Prize. Professor Noel is a past coordinator of Gender Studies at her UTM Department and current coordinator of its Heads Up Writing Program. Specialization: Early Canada, Comparative Colonial History, Gender History. Current Courses: HIS326Y5S, HIS498Y5Y.

The Fathers of Confederation are the 36 people who attended at least one of the Charlottetown (23 attendees) and Quebec (33) Conferences in 1864 and the London Conference of 1866 (16) in England, preceding Canadian Confederation. The following lists the participants in the Charlottetown, Quebec, and London Conferences and their attendance at each stage. Queen Victoria has been called the "Mother of Confederation". Her role in Confederation is recognized by the celebration of Victoria Day in Canada.

The Temperance movement has played a large part in the history of Canada. From the founding of the first known temperance society in 1822 until the passage or near passage of prohibition laws in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the province of Canada in 1855, over half a million colonists took the abstinence pledge.

This overview by Jan Noel is the first major study of the subject since Prohibition in Canada by Ruth Spence, published in 1919. Whereas Spence's book was the work of a dedicated prohibition warrior, Noel's study is social history examining the forces that created the temperance movement and the effect of the movement on work, women, children, religion, and social structure.

Noel perceives the call for temperance as a hybrid of idealism and material concerns. She assesses the interplay of these concerns in the regions of British North America where the movement showed strength before Confederation: the Atlantic colonies of Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island; the province of Canada (the southern areas of today's Quebec and Ontario); and the Red River colony.

The temperance movement worked. It eliminated the acceptance of drink in the workplace and reduced the amount of alcohol consumed. It throve best and longest where improved communications and a middle class grew. And in conjunction with the broader social-reform agenda of the day, it remade the manners and morals of British North America.