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by Charlotte M Gradie

Author: Charlotte M Gradie
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of Utah Press; F First Edition edition (December 3, 2005)
Pages: 238 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.4
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Read by Charlotte M. Gradie. Jesuit evangelism, as well as the Tepehuan capacity for military and cultural resistance. The unrest resulted in the death of over two hundred Spaniards, along with an uncounted number of slaves and servants.

Read by Charlotte M. Ten missionaries, eight of them Jesuits, also died, and there was massive destruction of property. The number of Tepehuanes who died from war-related causes was estimated by one Spanish source at 4,000. The horror of the uprising for the Spanish was enhanced by its total surprise.

Home GRADIE, Charlotte M. The Tepehuan Revolt of 1616: Militarism . Bibliographic Details. The Tepehuan Revolt of 1616: Militarism, Evangelism, and. Title: The Tepehuan Revolt of 1616: Militarism,. Publisher: University of Utah Press, 2000. Publication Date: 2000. The proprietors travel extensively and have bases both in the USA and the UK. Our specialty is books in religion and theology, but we stock all academic subject areas and seek to serve the academic community with books of scholarly interest and usefulness. Visit Seller's Storefront.

book by Charlotte M.

Militarism, Evangelism and Colonialism in 17th Century. By Charlotte M Gradie. CONTACT US. The University of Utah Press J. Willard Marriott Library 295 South 1500 East, Suite 5400 Salt Lake City, UT 84112. Office: 801-585-0082 fax: 801-581-3365.

militarism, evangelism and colonialism in seventeenth-century Nueva Vizcaya. by Charlotte M. Insurrection, 1616, Jesuits, Missions, Politics and government, Tepehuan Indians. Published 2000 by University of Utah Press in Salt Lake City.

Book by Gradie, Charlotte . We dont sell nor produce nor supply.

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Charlotte M. gradie, the tepehuan REVOLT of 1616: militarism, evangelism, and colonialism in seventeenth-century nueva vizcaya (salt lake city.

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The Tepehuan revolt of 1616: Militarism, evangelism, and colonialism in seventeenth-century Nueva Vizcaya. Archaeologies of persistence: Reconsidering the legacies of colonialism in native North America. American Antiquity, 78(1), 105–122. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Salt Lake City: Unviersity of Utah Press. Graham, . Simmons, S. & White, C. D. (2013). Parmenter, J. (2010).

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A contemporary observer of the four-year Tepehuan Indian revolt in a northern province of New Spain described it as "one of the greatest outbreaks of disorder, upheaval, and destruction that had been seen in New Spain since the Conquest".

In The Tepehuan Revolt of 1616, Charlotte Gradie presents the uprising as a pivotal test of both the Spanish institutions of conquest and Jesuit evangelism, as well as the Tepehuan capacity for military and cultural resistance. The unrest resulted in the death of over two hundred Spaniards, along with an uncounted number of slaves and servants. Ten missionaries, eight of them Jesuits, also died, and there was massive destruction of property. The number of Tepehuanes who died from war-related causes was estimated by one Spanish source at 4,000.

The horror of the uprising for the Spanish was enhanced by its total surprise. The Tepehuanes, considered "pacified" since 1590, were known for their bellicosity, but by the time of the uprising many had settled in mission towns supervised by Jesuits who spoke the native language. For the Spanish, the only logical explanation was that the Tepehuanes' revolt was the work of the devil. Although the Spanish policy toward indigenous peoples had evolved from one of total war to one that relied on the more peaceful missions, the revolt caused the Spanish to reintroduce the presidio system to protect the missions and the labor source for their expanding economy.

While the ultimately unsuccessful revolt may have been an effort by Tepehuan warrior elite to reassert their authority, it resulted in a reaffirmation of Jesuit missionary activity in Mexico and altered Spanish colonial methods in Sinaloa, Sonora, BajaCalifornia, and Arizona.