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by Marilynn S. Johnson

Author: Marilynn S. Johnson
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Beacon Press (October 31, 2004)
Pages: 378 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit lrf mobi lit

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements . A masterfully crafted chronicle.

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate i. The pages are sprinkled with fascinating episodes and anecdotes, uncovering the 'story behind the story' for such police practices as 'the third degree' and 'sweatboxes.

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it, from just after the Civil War through the present.

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality cases in New York and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it. Examining police violence from the period just after the Civil War to the present-from. a well-written, intelligent and at times even colorful examination of one of the perennial problems of urban life. an invaluable contribution to the histories both of New York and of American law enforcement in general.

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it, from just after the Civil War through the present

Street Justice: A History of Police Violence in New York City'. Marilynn Johnson talks with NPR's Tavis Smiley about her new book, Street Justice: A History of Police Violence in New York City.

Street Justice: A History of Police Violence in New York City'. Street Justice: A History of Police Violence in New York City'.

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A History of Police Violence in New York City. By Marilynn S. Johnson. Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it, from just after the Civil War through the present. Oct 31, 2004 ISBN 9780807050231. 365 pp. Boston: Beacon Press. Not very surprisingly, Johnson finds that police brutality has been most often directed against ethnic minorities, especially blacks and Hispanics; against strikers, student radicals and the poor. Incidents of police violence have even tended to revisit the same location. There were ''outrages,'' for instance, by the police against demonstrators of various stripes in Tompkins Square Park in 1873, again in 1967 and yet again in 1988.

3. Description this book Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it, from just after the Civil War through the present.

Street Justice traces the stunning history of police brutality in New York City, and the antibrutality movements that sought to eradicate it, from just after the Civil War through the present. New York's experience with police brutality dates back to the founding of the force and has shown itself in various forms ever since: From late-nineteenth-century "clubbing"-the routine bludgeoning of citizens by patrolmen with nightsticks-to the emergence of the "third degree," made notorious by gangster movies, from the violent mass-action policing of political dissidents during periods of social unrest, such as the 1930s and 1960s, to the tumultuous days following September 11.Yet throughout this varied history, the victims of police violence have remained remarkably similar: they have been predominantly poor and working class, and more often than not they have been minorities. Johnson compellingly argues that the culture of policing will only be changed when enough sustained political pressure and farsighted thinking about law enforcement is brought to bear on the problem.